Search This Blog(textbook name or author as the keywords)You can cantact me by the Contact Form

9/12/14

Business Communication: Process and Product, 7th Edition Mary Ellen Guffey | Dana Loewy solutions manual and test bank

Business Communication: Process and Product, 7th Edition Mary Ellen Guffey | Dana Loewy solutions manual and test bank

clip_image002

Chapter 2 LECTURE NOTES AND TEACHING SUGGESTIONS

Professionalism: Team, Meeting, Listening, Nonverbal,

and Etiquette Skills

CHAPTER SYNOPSIS

This chapter emphasizes the importance of soft skills and why they are becoming increasingly important in our knowledge-based economy. Soft skills include oral and written communications, listening proficiency, nonverbal communication, the ability to work in teams, and etiquette expertise. By developing soft skills, students will increase their ability to succeed in today’s competitive work environment. With the increased use of teams in the workplace, it’s particularly important for students to understand the roles of team members and how to contribute to the productivity of the team. This chapter also describes effective practices for planning and participating in virtual meetings. To familiarize students with technologies used to connect employees around the globe, chapter 2 also describes the tools used to connect virtual teams, including voice conferencing, videoconferencing, Web conferencing, instant messaging, blogs, and wikis.

Because listening is usually the least developed areas of communication, the chapter describes effective listening techniques and stresses that effective listening skills are essential for workplace success. Finally, the chapter stresses the importance of paying attention to and interpreting the meaning of what others are saying, both verbally and nonverbally, and gaining a competitive edge by demonstrating professionalism and business etiquette skills.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

1. Explain the importance of professionalism, soft skills, and teamwork in today’s workplace.

2. Understand how you can contribute positively to team performance, including resolving workplace conflicts, avoiding groupthink, and reaching group decisions.

3. Discuss effective techniques for planning and participating in face-to-face workplace meetings.

4. Describe effective practices and technologies for planning and participating in virtual meetings.

5. Explain and implement active listening techniques.

6. Understand how the functions and forms of nonverbal communication can help you advance your career.

7. Enhance your competitive edge by developing professionalism and business etiquette skills.

WHAT’S NEW IN THIS CHAPTER

· Focused chapter on professional workplace skills to help students make a smooth transition from the classroom to the business world.

· Revised three-part opening case study to reflect the current economic downturn and importance of professional skills and teamwork.

· Distinguished between face-to-face and virtual meetings, emphasizing the latter because virtual meetings reduce travel costs, lessen employee fatigue, and connect remote workers.

· Added instructions and Web screenshot illustrating the use of digital calendars to schedule meetings so that students will know how to use this electronic tool.

· Added Web screenshot to illustrate e-mail meeting summary template so that students see how savvy companies are using digital tools to summarize key points and note action items to monitor.

· Provided many tips and specific ground rules on how to plan and interact professionally during virtual meetings.

· Emphasized the importance of soft skills and professionalism in regard to being hired and promoted.

· Changed nearly 40 percent of the end-of-chapter activities to offer instructors fresh, relevant, and practical exercises for students to apply chapter content.

LECTURE OUTLINE

I. Becoming a Team Player in Professional Groups (p. 39)

· Hard skills refer to the technical skills in your field. Soft skills include both oral and written communication skills. Soft skills also include other competencies such as listening proficiency, nonverbal behavior, and etiquette expertise. Employers also value employees who are team players.

PowerPoint slides 1-3

II. Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams (p. 40)

A. Why Form Groups and Teams?

· Better decisions

· Faster response

· Increased productivity

· Greater “buy-in”

· Less resistance to change

· Improved employee morale

· Reduced risks

PowerPoint slide 4

B. Examples of Effective Teams

· Teams are effective in solving workplace problems and developing new products.

C. Virtual Teams

Definition: Virtual teams are groups of people who work interdependently with a shared purpose across space, time, and organization boundaries using technology.

D. Four Phases of Team Development

· Forming—members get to know each other and establish rules for working together

· Storming—members define their roles and plans for achieving goals; conflict may arise

· Norming—tensions subside, roles are clarified, and information is exchanged

· Performing—team reaches a state of high performance

PowerPoint slide 5

clip_image004 Let’s Discuss

Four employees of a design firm have formed a team to plan a new business presentation to a prestigious client. The employees represent four areas of the business: design, production, finance, and marketing. The finance manager and marketing manager have a heated disagreement about the objectives of the presentation and the cost of the proposed marketing plan. Tension is so high that the team leader steps in to help address the conflict.

What stage of team development is this team experiencing?

This team is demonstrating characteristics of a team in the storming phase of development where conflict about the team’s goals and members’ roles may erupt. When this occurs, a good team leader will step in to set offer suggestions for getting the team back on track and progressing toward its goals.

Figure 2.1 Why Teams Fail: Typical Problems, Symptoms, and Solutions

E. Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior

A team player showing positive behavior:

· Willingly establishes rules and abides by them

· Analyzes tasks and defines problems.

· Offers information and tries out their ideas on the group

· Listens actively

· Involves silent members

· Helps resolve differences and encourages a supportive environment

A team player showing negative behavior:

· Insults and criticizes others

· Wastes time by talking about irrelevant topics

· Disrupts with inappropriate comments and disruptive tactics

· Withdraws and refuses to participate in discussions

PowerPoint slides 6-7

Figure 2.2 Positive and Negative Team Behaviors

F. Six-Step Procedure for Dealing with Conflict

1. Listen.

2. Understand the other’s point of view.

3. Show a concern for the relationship.

4. Look for common ground.

5. Invent new problem-solving options.

6. Reach an agreement based on what is fair.

PowerPoint slide 8

clip_image004[1] Let’s Discuss

How should a manager address conflict that is a result of differences in culture, gender, age, or experience?

The more diverse the workplace becomes, the greater potential for conflict based on differences. Managers need to become more active listeners as opposed to just barking out orders. In addition to the strategies listed in the chapter, active listeners should ask open-ended questions such as, “Ty, when Jake suggested we send letters to all our customers about the cell phone recall, what was your reaction?” Then, the manager should let Ty speak without assuming she knows his answer and without passing judgment. (Steve Adubato, “Asking Right Questions Can Help With Conflict,” The Star-Ledger, April 8, 2007. Retrieved May 22, 2007 from http://www.gale.com/BusinessRC/.)

G. Avoiding Groupthink

Definition: Groupthink describes faulty decision-making processes by team members who are overly eager to agree with one another. Effective teams can avoid groupthink by adhering to the following:

· Strive for team diversity—in age, gender, background, experience, and training.

· Encourage open discussion.

· Search for relevant information.

· Evaluate many alternatives.

· Consider how a decision will be implemented.

· Plan for contingencies in case the decision doesn’t work out.

clip_image004[2] Let’s Discuss

What are the advantages and disadvantages of groupthink in organizations?

Advantages: Groupthink reflects the team’s desire for cohesiveness and harmony, a desirable trait for teams working toward a shared purpose.
Disadvantages: (a) Group members are reluctant to express opinions resulting in poorer decisions; and (b) group members fail to check alternatives, are biased in collecting information, and fail to develop a contingency plan.

H. Reaching Group Decisions

· Majority

· Consensus

· Minority

· Averaging

· Authority rule with discussion

PowerPoint slide 9

I. Characteristics of Successful Teams

· Small size, diverse makeup

· Agreement on purpose

· Agreement on procedures

· Ability to confront conflict

· Use of good communication techniques

· Ability to collaborate rather than compete

· Acceptance of ethical responsibilities

· Shared leadership

PowerPoint slide 10

III. Checklist for Developing Team Effectiveness (p. 47)

· Establish small teams.

· Encourage diversity.

· Determine the purpose, procedures, and roles.

· Acknowledge and manage conflict.

· Cultivate good communication skills.

· Advance an environment of open communication.

· Encourage collaboration and discourage competition.

· Share leadership.

· Create a sense of fairness in making decisions.

· Lighten up.

· Continually assess performance.

IV. Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings (p. 48)

PowerPoint slides 11-15

A. Deciding Whether a Meeting Is Necessary

· Only call for a meeting if the topic is important, can’t wait, and requires an exchange of ideas.

· The real expense of a meeting is the lost productivity of the people attending.

B. Selecting Participants

· Decision-makers

· Those with information needed to make a decision

· Those responsible for implementing the decision

Figure 2.3 Meeting Purpose and Number of Participants

C. Distributing Advance Information

· Date and place of meeting

· Start time and end time

· Brief description of each topic, in order of priority, including the names of individuals who are responsible for performing some action

· Proposed allotment of time for each topic

· Any premeeting preparation expected of participants

Figure 2.4 Typical Meeting Agenda

D. Using Digital Calendars to Schedule Meetings

· Schedule meetings

· Check availability of attendees

· Keep track of daily activities

· Receive reminders of meeting times

Figure 2.5 Using Calendar Programs

E. Getting the Meeting Started

· Goal and length of the meeting

· Background of topics or problems

· Possible solutions and constraints

· Tentative agenda

· Ground rules to be followed

F. Moving the Meeting Along

· Encourage equal participation among participants.

· Avoid digressions and generate a “Parking Lot” list.

· Adhere to the time schedule and agenda.

· Summarize key decisions and check on agreement.

G. Participating Actively and Productively

· Arrive early.

· Come prepared.

· Bring a positive attitude.

· Contribute respectfully.

· Wait for others to finish.

· Keep your voice calm and pleasant, yet energetic.

· Give credit to others.

· Put the cell phone and laptop away.

· Help summarize.

· Express your views IN the meeting.

· Follow up and complete the assigned actions.

H. Handling Conflict in Meetings

· Encourage full discussion of issues.

· Reach consensus on a direction to follow.

I. Ending and Following Up

· End on time.

· Summarize decisions.

· Agree on who is responsible for action items and by what time.

· Distribute minutes within a couple of days after the meeting.

Figure 2.6 E-Mail Meeting Minutes

V. Checklist for Planning and Participating in Productive Meetings (p. 57)

Before the Meeting

· Consider alternatives.

· Invite the right people.

· Distribute an agenda.

· Use a calendaring program.

· Train participants on technology.

During the Meeting

· Start on time and introduce the agenda.

· Appoint a secretary and a recorder.

· Encourage balanced participation.

· Confront conflict frankly.

· Summarize along the way.

Ending the Meeting and Following Up

· Review meeting decisions.

· Distribute minutes of meeting.

· Remind people of action items.

VI. Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings (p. 53)

PowerPoint slide 16

A. Audioconferencing

· Audioconferencing involves one or more people in a work area using an enhanced speakerphone to confer with others by telephone.

B. Voiceconferencing

· Videoconferencing combines video, audio, and communications networking technologies for real-time interaction.

· Videoconferencing reduces travel expenses, travel time, and employee fatigue.

PowerPoint slides 17, 18

clip_image004[3] Let’s Discuss

What are the advantages and disadvantages of videoconferencing?

Advantages:

1. Videoconferencing allows people who are geographically spread out to collaborate and reach a decision.

2. Videoconferencing is more effective than conference calls because it allows participants to view facial expressions and body language.

3. Breakthroughs in video, audio, and broadband technologies create meeting experiences that are so lifelike that participants who are thousands of miles apart look like they’re in the same room.

4. Videoconferencing reduces travel time, travel expenses, and employee fatigue.

Disadvantages:

1. Videoconferencing systems are expensive. Conventional videoconference rooms may cost $5,000–$80,000 per room.

2. Videoconferencing is still not better than face-to-face meetings.

C. Web Conferencing

· Web conferencing allows attendees to access an online virtual meeting room where they can present PowerPoint slides or share spreadsheets or Word documents, just as they might do in a face-to-face meeting.

PowerPoint slide 19

Figure 2.7 Web Conferencing

Figure 2.8 WebEx Conferencing on iPhone

Figure 2.9 Web Conferencing in Practice

D. Planning Virtual Meetings and Interacting Professionally

Premeeting Considerations:

· Decide which technology will be used

· Coach participants on using technology

· Set the time of the meeting using Coordinated Universal Time

· For global meetings, decide which language will be used.

· Distribute materials in advance

Ground Rules for Virtual Meetings:

· Explain how questions may be asked and answered.

· Turn off cell phones and smartphones.

· Don’t multitask while participating in a virtual meeting.

Techniques for Collaborating Successfully in Virtual Meetings

· Be precise, give examples, and use simple language.

· Recap and summarize often.

· Confirm your understanding of what is being discussed.

· As a presenter, project an upbeat and strong voice.

· Encourage dialogue by asking questions and inviting responses.

· Allow time before or after the meeting for small talk.

PowerPoint slides 20-21

VII. Listening in the Workplace (p. 58)

A. Poor Listening Habits

Poor listening habits result from the following:

· Lack of training

· Competing sounds and stimuli

· Ability to process speech faster than others speak

clip_image004[4] Let’s Discuss

Former Xerox CEO David Kearns learned that he should have listened to his employees before the company’s disastrous launch of a new copier. “We could have told you it was a piece of junk,” said one employee, “but you never asked our opinion.” Why is it important to listen to colleagues and teammates in the workplace?

In the workplace, listening to teammates and colleagues vastly improves your ability to make good decisions. By listening to others, you tap into their experiences and insights about workplace issues resulting in better choices and decisions. (Fred Green, “Our Biggest Management Challenge: Communication,” Indianapolis Business Journal, March 26, 2007. Retrieved May 22, 2007 from http://www.gale.com/BusinessRC/.)

B. Types of Workplace Listening

· Listening to superiors

· Listening to colleagues and teammates

· Listening to customers

PowerPoint slide 22

Figure 2.10 Listening to Customers: Comparing Trained and Untrained Listeners

VIII. Improving Workplace Listening

A. Ten Keys to Building Powerful Listening Skills

1. Control external and internal distractions.

2. Become actively involved.

3. Separate facts from opinions.

4. Identify important facts.

5. Avoid interrupting.

6. Ask clarifying questions.

7. Paraphrase to increase understanding.

8. Capitalize on lag time.

9. Take notes to ensure retention.

10. Be aware of gender differences.

PowerPoint slides 23-35

IX. Checklist for Improving Listening (p. 62)

· Stop talking.

· Work hard at listening.

· Block out competing thoughts.

· Control the listening environment.

· Maintain an open mind.

· Paraphrase the speaker’s ideas.

· Listen between the lines.

· Distinguish between facts and opinions.

· Capitalize on lag time.

· Use memory devices.

· Take selective notes.

clip_image004[5] Let’s Discuss

According to Thomas Friedman, author and foreign affairs columnist for The New York Times, “It’s not just what you hear by listening that is important. It is what you say by listening that is important. It’s amazing how you can diffuse a whole roomful of angry people by just starting your answer to a question with the phrase, ‘You’re making a legitimate point’ or ‘I hear what you say’ and really meaning it.”

Why do these phrases reduce barriers to communication?

Never underestimate how much people just want to feel that they have been heard. Once you demonstrate you have listened to them and respect their opinions, barriers come down and they become more willing to continue a healthy dialogue with you. Commencement address at Williams College
Williamstown, Massachusetts, USA. Retrieved June 5, 2005, from http://www.humanity.org/voices/commencements/speeches/index.php?page=friedman_at_williams)


X. Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages (p. 63)

A. Functions of Nonverbal Communication

· To complement and illustrate

· To reinforce and accentuate

· To replace and substitute

· To control and regulate

· To contradict

PowerPoint slide 36

B. Forms of Nonverbal Communication

· Eye contact—maintain direct but not prolonged eye contact

· Facial expression—express warmth with frequent smiles

· Posture and gestures—convey self-confidence with erect stance

· Time—be on time; use time judiciously

· Space—maintain neat, functional work areas

· Territory—use closeness to show warmth and to reduce status differences

· Appearance of business documents—product careful, neat, well-organized messages

· Appearance of people—be well groomed, neat, and appropriately dressed

PowerPoint slides 37-38

Figure 2.11 Four Space Zones for Social Interaction

Figure 2.12 Sending Positive Nonverbal Signals in the Workplace

XI. Checklist for Techniques for Improving Communication Skills in the Workplace
(p. 67)

· Establish and maintain eye contact.

· Use posture to show interest.

· Reduce or eliminate physical barriers.

· Improve your decoding skills.

· Probe for more information.

· Avoid assigning nonverbal meanings out of context.

· Associate with people from diverse cultures.

· Appreciate the power of appearance.

· Observe yourself on videotape.

· Enlist friends and family.

XII. Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills (p. 68)

A. Professionalism Leads to Success

PowerPoint slides 39-41

Figure 2.13 Projecting Professionalism When You Communicate

B. Gaining an Etiquette Edge

· Use polite words.

· Express sincere appreciation and praise.

· Be selective in sharing personal information.

· Don’t put people down.

· Respect coworkers’ space.

· Rise above others’ rudeness.

· Be considerate when sharing space and equipment with others.

· Choose the high road in conflict.

· Disagree agreeably.

Lecture Transparencies

(available in a separate packet and at http://www.meguffey.com)

Developing Team, Listening, and Etiquette Skills Transparency

Acetates Number

What Do Employers Want? 13
Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams 14
Four Phases of Team Development 15

Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior 16

Six-Step Procedure for Dealing With Conflict 17

Methods for Reaching Group Decisions 18

Characteristics of Successful Teams 19

Duties of Meeting Leader 20

Duties of Meeting Participant 21

Virtual Meetings 22

Listening in the Workplace 23

Skillful Listening to Customers 24

Ten Keys to Building Powerful Listening Skills 25

Ten Misconceptions About Listening 26–27

Functions of Nonverbal Communication 28

Forms of Nonverbal Communication 29

Project Professionalism When You Communicate 30

Tips for Gaining an Etiquette Edge 31


Answers to Chapter Review Questions

1. List seven reasons that explain why organizations are forming groups and teams. (Obj. 1)

Organizations are forming groups and teams for (1) better decisions, (2) faster response, (3) increased productivity, (4) greater buy-in, (5) less resistance to change, (6) improved employee morale, and (7) reduced risks for individuals.

2. What are virtual teams, and how can misunderstandings among participants be reduced? (Obj. 1)

Virtual teams are groups that work interdependently with a shared purpose across space, time, and organizational boundaries using technology. Misunderstandings can be reduced by building credibility and trust in the beginning, establishing responsibilities, keeping track of information, and being patient and positive in responding to e-mail messages.

3. Compare and contrast positive and negative team behavior. (Obj. 2)

Positive team behavior includes setting rules and abiding by them, analyzing tasks and defining problems, contributing information and ideas, showing interest by listening actively, encouraging members to participate, and synthesizing points of agreement. Negative behavior involves blocking the ideas and suggestions of others, insulting and criticizing others, wasting the group’s time, making inappropriate jokes and comments, failing to stay on task, and failing to participate.

4. What is groupthink, and how can it be avoided? (Obj. 2)

Groupthink describes faulty decision making reached by teams who are overly eager to agree. Teams suffering from groupthink fail to examine alternatives, are biased in collecting and evaluating information, and ignore the risks of the preferred choice. Groupthink can be avoided by choosing diverse team members, encouraging open discussion, searching for relevant information, and evaluating many alternatives.

5. Why are team decisions based on consensus generally better than decisions reached by majority rule? (Obj. 2)

Consensus means that all members must agree to the decision. Although this method may require more discussion and more team time, it generally results in a fair decision that members are willing to implement. Decisions reached by majority rule leave some team members who object and who may sabotage the decision.


6. If you are considering organizing a meeting, what should you do before the meeting? (Obj. 3)

You should (a) decide whether a meeting is necessary, (b) decide who needs to attend, (c) consider using a calendaring program to establish a schedule, and (d) distribute advance information including an agenda.

7. List five behaviors you consider most important in participating actively in workplace meetings. (Obj. 3)

Students should select from among the following: (1) Arrive early, (2) come prepared, (3) bring a positive attitude, (4) contribute respectfully, (5) wait for others to finish, (6) keep your voice calm and pleasant yet energetic, (7) give credit to others, (8) put the cell phone and laptop away, (9) help summarize, (10) express your views IN the meeting and not afterwards, and (11) follow up on your assigned tasks.

8. How is videoconferencing different from Web conferencing? (Obj. 4)

Videoconferencing combines video, audio, and communications networking technologies for real-time interaction. It is usually done in special videoconferencing rooms, some of which are very expensive. Web conferencing is similar to videoconferencing, but it is done from individuals’ computers and may not involve video transmission.

9. What techniques can make virtual meetings as effective as face-to-face meetings? (Obj. 4)

Effective virtual meeting techniques include (a) making sure all participants can use the technology; (b) establishing a uniform time, perhaps using Coordinated Universal Time (UTC); (c) distributing necessary materials in advance; (d) explaining how questions may be asked and answered; (e) controlling background noise; (f) avoiding multitasking during the meeting; (g) giving examples and using precise language; and (h) using “round the table” to encourage each participant to speak.

10. According to experts, we ignore, forget, distort, or misunderstand 75 percent of everything we hear. Why are we such poor listeners? (Obj. 5)

Poor listening habits may result from lack of training, as well as the large number of competing sounds and stimuli that interfere with concentration. In addition, we are poor listeners because our minds are able to process speech much faster than people can speak.

11. What are ten techniques for improving workplace listening? Be prepared to describe each. (Obj. 5)

(1) Control external and internal distractions, (2) become actively involved, (3) separate facts from opinions, (4) identify important facts, (5) don’t interrupt, (6) ask clarifying questions, (7) paraphrase to increase understanding, (8) take advantage of lag time, (9) take notes to improve retention, and (10) be aware of gender differences.

12. List five functions of nonverbal communication. Provide an original example of each. (Obj. 6)

(1) To complement and illustrate. Example: Holding your hands apart to show the size of your netbook computer. (2) To reinforce and accentuate. Example: Clapping your hands to show approval. (3) To replace and substitute. Example: Yawning and covering your mouth to show boredom. (4) To control and regulate. Example: Letting your voice drop at the end of a statement signaling the completion of a thought. (5) To contradict. Example: Stating that you love your friend’s new fragrance but holding your nose.

13. List ten techniques for improving nonverbal communication skills in the workplace. Be prepared to discuss each. (Obj. 6)

(1) Establish and maintain eye contact, (2) use posture to show interest, (3) reduce or eliminate physical barriers, (4) improve decoding skills, (5) probe for more information, (6) avoid assigning nonverbal meanings out of context, (7) associate with people from diverse cultures, (8) appreciate the power of appearance, (9) observe yourself on videotape, and (10) enlist friends and family to provide feedback on your body language.

14. Compare and contrast examples of professional and unprofessional behavior in regard to workplace speech habits and e-mail. (Obj. 7)

Unprofessional speech habits include speaking in uptalk, using like to fill in mindless chatter, substituting go for said, relying on slang, and letting profanity slip into your conversation. Professional speakers avoid anything that sounds uneducated, crude, or adolescent. Unprofessional e-mail behavior involves writing messages with incomplete sentences, misspelled words, IM slang, and senseless chatting. Professional e-mail messages are concise, correct, and concrete. They avoid sloppiness.

15. What five specific behaviors do you think would be most important in giving you an etiquette edge in your business career? (Obj. 7)

Students will choose five from among the following: (1) use polite words, (2) express sincere appreciation and praise, (3) be selective in sharing personal information, (4) don’t put people down, (5) respect coworkers’ space, (6) rise above others’ rudeness, (7) be considerate when sharing space and equipment with others, (8) choose the high road in conflict, and (9) disagree agreeably.

Answers to Critical Thinking Questions

1. Harvard professor and team expert J. Richard Hackman claims that research “consistently shows that teams underperform despite all their extra resources.”[i] How would you, as a critical thinker, respond to this statement? (Obj. 1)

A critical thinker might question a general statement claiming that “research shows” something. How many studies were involved? Who conducted the research? What is the writer’s definition of underperform? What is meant by extra resources? Teams are generally thought to produce better results than individuals. Why would “research” show something contrary? If it is true that teams underperform, why do companies continue to form teams to investigate and recommend solutions to problems? A critical thinker could find much to dispute in this statement.

2. Evaluate the following statement: “Technical proficiency has never been enough for professionals to grow beyond the staff level.” Do you agree or disagree, and why? (Obj. 1)

Although the author, David Maturo, writing in The Pennsylvania CPA Journal, is referring to job candidates in technical fields, the statement is also true for nearly all job candidates. Employers are looking for “soft” skills that include communication, interpersonal, and team skills. In the accounting and other technical fields, a staff position is only a foot in the door. One writer observed that in technical fields, state-of-the-art knowledge has the half life of a gnat! (N. Johnson, “The Hard Truth About Soft Skills,” Computerworld, March 20, 1999, p. 33). Technical skills in every field are short-lived because technology is constantly evolving; new programs, new tools, and new competencies are required.

3. Why do executives and managers spend more time listening than do workers?
(Obj. 5)

Before they can make decisions, executives must listen to feedback from supervisors, specialists, and others. They also listen to their bosses—boards of directors and owners—and they might also need to listen to customers, especially when handling serious complaints. Minds are like parachutes; they work well only when open. All three levels of workers should have good listening skills; but because the decisions coming from executives’ listening may be more critical, their skills should perhaps be most highly developed.

4. What arguments could you give for or against the idea that body language is a science with principles that can be interpreted accurately by specialists? (Obj. 6)

Although few would argue that body language does send silent messages, no scientific principles have evolved explaining exactly what those messages mean. Most researchers agree that nonverbal cues contain much information, but specifically what those cues mean is unknown. Authors Hickson and Stacks said, “The nonverbal message by itself may be ambiguous; in almost every instance it needs the verbal message to complete the process of communication” [(1993). Nonverbal Communication. Brown and Benchmark, p. 8]. Julius Fast, author of the precedent-setting Body Language [(1971). New York: Pocket Books, p. 14], stated that “nonverbal language is partly instinctive, partly taught and partly imitative.” But it is not a science with principles that always hold true. Most communicators tend to believe nonverbal messages over verbal messages when the messages are in conflict. The Chinese have a profound proverb: “Be wary of the man whose belly does not move when he laughs.” People who are sincerely laughing show it with their entire bodies, not just their faces.

5. Ethical Issue: Rochelle is a good member of your team. However, you are disturbed that she is constantly promoting her Arbonne beauty products to other members of the team. She shows catalogs and keeps a supply of samples ready to distribute during lunch or after hours. Her desk smells like a perfume counter. During team meetings, she puts an order form on the table. As a team member, what should you do? What if Rochelle were selling Girl Scout cookies?

Selling for-profit items on company property is probably forbidden by your company. Rochelle is taking advantage of a captive audience. Even though most of the activity is taking place during lunch or after work hours, the activity could carry over into work time and could disrupt productivity. It would be wise for you to report the situation to your team leader, manager, or human resources representative. You should also check to see what the company’s policy is on selling nonprofit items such as Girl Scout cookies.

Activities

2.1 Soft Skills: Identifying Personal Strengths (Obj. 1)

Your students should submit a list of four categories of soft skills. Encourage them to frame statements that will be useful when they prepare a résumé later in the course. For example, under “Thinking/problem solving,” a student might write, “Learned new spreadsheet program and prepared cost projection for remodeling office,” or “Learn new software applications quickly and with little training.”

2.2 Team Effort: Denny’s Hopes to Rock With All-Nighter Program (Obj. 1)

In persuading the marketing vice president that a team effort is needed to consider expanding Denny’s All-Nighter program to the Southwest, students might mention some of the following points:

· A team of managers would bring wider experience to the decision. They would contribute more expertise and different perspectives.

· Should the decision be made to implement the program, the company would experience greater buy-in if the managers who approved the plan were the ones to implement it.

· The All-Nighter program would generate less resistance to change if the managers were involved in the decision.

· Overall morale among managers would be enhanced if they were invited to participate in this major decision.

· Responsibility for the decision is diffused, thus carrying less risk for a single individual making the decision.

2.3 Reaching Group Decisions: Majority, Consensus, or What? (Obj. 2)

More than one strategy may be appropriate for these situations. The author’s recommendations follow.

a. Majority would work, but consensus would be better.

b. Majority

c. Authority rule with discussion

d. Consensus

e. Majority

f. Minority

g. Majority would work, but consensus would be better.

h. Minority

2.4 Resolving Workplace Conflicts: Apply a Plan (Obj. 2)

Students should apply the following six-step procedure: (1) Listen to each person’s position. (2) Understand the other’s point of view. Ask questions and paraphrase what you hear. (3) Show a concern for the relationship. Show an understanding of the other person’s situation and needs. (4) Look for common ground. Strive to achieve a solution to which both sides can agree. (5) Invent new problem-solving options, if necessary. (6) Reach an agreement based on what’s fair. Encourage students to role-play two or more of the scenarios.

2.5 Groupthink: Fastest Decision May Not Be Best (Obj. 2)

a. This group seemed too eager to make a quick decision. It failed to consider alternatives, and the chair was too invested in his recommendation.

b. The following conditions can lead to groupthink: team members with similar backgrounds, a lack of methodical procedures, a demand for a quick decision, and a strong leader who favors a specific decision.

c. Groups can avoid groupthink by striving for team diversity in age, gender, background, experience, and training. They should encourage open discussion, search for relevant information, evaluate many alternatives, consider how a decision will be implemented, and plan for contingencies in case the decision doesn’t work out.

2.6 Lessons in Teamwork: What We Can Learn From Geese (Objs. 1, 2)

a. Lesson: Teams working as a unit can accomplish more than individuals working alone.

b. Lesson: Team members who recognize the effectiveness of team goals, procedures, and assignments strive to stay “in formation” because they realize that teamwork requires less energy and has better results than flying solo.

c. Lesson: Shared leadership and interdependence give each team member a chance to lead as well as an opportunity to rest. Team members should be prepared to lead when necessary.

d. Lesson: Team members can motivate leaders and fellow members with encouragement. Teammates need to make sure their “honking” is encouraging rather than discouraging.

e. Lesson: We all may need help from time to time. We should stand by our teammates in difficult times.

2.7 Evaluating Meetings: Effective or Ineffective? (Obj. 3)

Students may analyze the meeting by using the following template to conclude whether the meeting succeeded or failed.

Getting Ready for the Meeting

a. Was the meeting truly necessary?

b. Were the right people there according to the purpose of the meeting?

c. Was an agenda distributed?

Conducting the Meeting

a. Did the meeting start on time?

b. Did the meeting chair open with an introduction of the topic, a summary of topics, possible solutions, a tentative agenda, and/or a review of ground rules?

c. Did the chair provide suggestions for moving the meeting along?

d. Was conflict dealt with successfully? Did the chair keep control of the meeting? Did committee members making their points without attacking each other?

e. Was the decision made by consensus or by vote? Were minority views encouraged and tolerated?

f. Did the meeting end on time or whenever consensus was reached, according to the ground rules agreed on?

Ending the Meeting and Following Up

a. Were decisions reviewed, action items discussed, and/or schedule for completion established?

b. Were committee members reminded to follow through on action items?

2.8 Virtual Meetings: Improving Distance Meeting Buy-In (Obj. 4)

a. Setting a more reasonable start time for the Seattle office would have shown courtesy to the West Coast participants.

b. Asking participants to log on early helps to avoid delays in starting a virtual meeting.

c. Reminding participants of ground rules such as turning off or muting cell phones and not checking e-mail during a virtual meeting encourages people to focus and be more involved.

d. Using interactivity helps prevent group members from losing interest. A technique such as “round the table” would have elicited more active participation and discouraged multitasking on the other end.

e. Distributing materials prior to a virtual meeting allows participants to prepare questions and be more involved during the session.

2.9 Web Conferencing: Take a Quick Tour

This engaging video makes Web conferencing sound simple and easy.

Step 1. Schedule a meeting by using Outlook, the WebEx site, or IM.

Step 2. Meet your participants online. They do not need to have WebEx to join. They merely click a link in your announcement e-mail or IM. They can join the teleconference by computer or phone.

Step 3. Show and tell involves sharing your desktop with participants. You can show documents, presentations, or applications. Everyone sees the same thing at the same time.

Students may question whether WebEx is the best choice for small conferences. Perhaps other programs should be investigated such as Skype.

2.10 Rating Your Listening Skills (Obj. 5)

This listening quiz focuses attention on good listening techniques as presented in the textbook. Although some of the answers are obvious, an interactive quiz presents an alternative learning mode that can pique student interest and reinforce good habits.

2.11 Listening: Recognizing Good Habits (Obj. 5)

Students should be able to name five good and five bad listening behaviors. They should clearly identify the situation and participant for each item on their lists. This activity presents an excellent opportunity for you to make students more conscious of how listening habits differ in people around them. You should also be able to discuss techniques for improving poor listening habits.

2.12 Listening: Skills Required in Various Careers (Obj. 5)

Student teams should generate lists of listening and nonverbal cues that include some of the following: good eye contact, avoiding being distracted by others while listening, not interrupting, taking notes, paraphrasing instructions, asking pertinent questions in a nonthreatening manner, leaning forward, and showing empathy and compassion. Critical listening involves judging and evaluating what you are hearing. Discriminative listening is necessary when you must identify main ideas and understand an argument. Teams should generate different cues and behavior reflecting these forms of listening in relation to the professional role they are analyzing.

2.13 Nonverbal Communication: Recognizing Functions (Obj. 6)

Students should be able to list several examples for each of the following nonverbal functions:

· To complement and illustrate

· To reinforce and accentuate

· To replace and substitute

· To control and regulate

· To contradict

2.14 Nonverbal Communication: How to Be More Influential (Obj. 6)

At meetings you should sit at the end of the table if possible. If that is not possible, sit where you can make eye contact with the majority of the group. Make frequent eye contact with those at the meeting. Provide positive feedback to speakers through eye contact, nodding, and asking clarifying questions. In interacting with colleagues, you can make a good impression and become more influential with nonverbal signals such as eye contact; warm facial expressions; erect posture; being on time; maintaining a neat, functional work area; and being well-groomed, neat, and appropriately dressed.

2.15 Nonverbal Communication: Body Language (Obj. 6)

The following body movements do not necessarily mean the same thing when used by different individuals. Remember that to a certain degree nonverbal communication can be culture or subculture specific, and context always plays a major role when you interpret this type of communication. Students may have other interpretations, but these body movements can be construed to mean the following:

a. Whistling, wringing hands: nervousness or fear

b. Bowed posture, twiddling thumbs: boredom

c. Steepled hands, sprawling sitting position: contemplative or relaxed

d. Rubbing hand through hair: frustration or nervousness

e. Open hands, unbuttoned coat: relaxed

f. Wringing hands, tugging ears: upset or nervous

2.16 Nonverbal Communication: Universal Sign for “I Goofed” (Obj. 6)

This is a good exercise for teams. Suggest that team members take turns demonstrating each of the nonverbal messages described here. They should then discuss how effective each would be. Of course, some would be quite dangerous if they require taking your hands off the steering wheel. Be sure to discuss with students the difficulty of cultural implications. Although a gesture might be effective in one country, it might not work in another.

2.17 Verbal vs. Nonverbal Signals (Obj. 6)

Although this is a neat trick, it hardly proves that nonverbal signals are ALWAYS more meaningful than verbal signals. The truth is that nonverbal signals nearly always depend on context. That is, the situation, setting, and accompanying verbal signals are necessary to interpret nonverbal signals appropriately. Much nonverbal communication is ambiguous without verbal explanation to explain and interpret it. One conclusion that might be drawn from this demonstration is that visual aids (gestures demonstrating an action) can help or hinder a listener in following instructions.

2.18 Nonverbal Communication: Signals Sent by Business Casual Dress (Obj. 6)

This activity can be expanded into a research paper topic. A variation on this activity relies on student experiences. Instead of conducting interviews in the community, they can conduct a forum among students who work, asking them to comment on casual-dress policies in the jobs they have had. Activity 7.5 in Chapter 7 also relates to casual dress.

2.19 Body Art: A Butterfly on Her Neck (Obj. 6)

Acceptance of tattoos depends on many factors such as the office environment, the company, the geographic area, one’s position within the company, the expectations of the company’s management team, and the company’s clientele. However, a career-conscious, ambitious person would probably advise a friend not to display the tattoo. Colleen Abrie, an image consultant, gave this advice: “If I worked in an administrative office and I got a tattoo and I was proud of it, I would go to the most senior person I could find and simply ask, ‘Is it okay if I let it show?’ I would go to my direct supervisor and find out if it’s appropriate.” [McCarty, M. (2007, January/February). Tattoos: Not just for sailors anymore. OfficePro, p. 26.]

2.20 Nonverbal Communication: Defining Business Casual (Obj. 6)

Team reports defining “business casual” will probably include some of the following information: Women should wear skirts, slacks, blouses, and jackets. Skirts should be no shorter than 2 inches above the knee. Hosiery should be worn in the fall and winter. No sandals or open-toed shoes, jeans, shorts, or hats. Men may wear khakis, dress slacks, polo shirts, button-down shirts, and jackets and ties (optional). Women should avoid leggings, spandex pants, casual and short shorts, ultrashort skirts, camisoles, sportswear T-shirts, jeans, sweats, athletic shoes, and thonglike flip-flop sandals. Men should avoid garish print sport shirts, sportswear T-shirts, sport team jackets, jeans, sweats, athletic “tube” socks, hiking boots, athletic shoes, and sandals. Activity 7.16 in Chapter 7 also relates to casual dress codes.

2.21 Nonverbal Communication Around the World (Obj. 6)

Students should be able to find a number of gestures and their meanings discussed at various Web sites. Here is one example: “The fingertip kiss, in which the tips of the thumb and fingers are kissed and quickly moved forward away from the face, is a sign of affection and may be used as a greeting in Sicily and Portugal. The fingertip kiss is not used often in Italy and the British Isles, but it is common in France, Germany, Greece, and Spain to signify praise” (J. S. Martin and L. H. Chaney, Global Business Etiquette, Praeger, 2006, p. 53).

2.22 Guide to Business Etiquette and Workplace Manners: Sharpening Your Skills
(Obj. 7)

Students are encouraged to take the pretest and study the 17 business etiquette topics presented at the student Web site at www.meguffey.com. Instructors will find a complete discussion guide titled “Workplace Etiquette Teaching Module” plus three posttests under Teaching Modules in the instructor’s materials at www.meguffey.com To see the 17 student exercises, go to the student site and click “Business Etiquette Guide.”

2.23 Business Etiquette: Mind Your Manners or Mind Your BlackBerry? (Obj. 7)

(a) Short policy statement:

In using a smartphone or other wireless device, be professional. Respect others.

(b) More complete policy:

· Turn your smartphone off or on vibrate. Keep it off the meeting table.

· Don’t look at it during a meeting or conversation.

· Don’t respond to a call, e-mail, or text during a meeting or conversation.

· If you are expecting an important call, let the person or meeting facilitator know in advance.

· Leave the room if you must take a call or respond to an e-mail.

· Shut the door quietly when you exit and enter the room.

· Apologize if you do interrupt the meeting.

· Use your e-mail “out of office” assistant and change your voice message to let people know you are not available.

· Post a sign if the organization has a “no cell phone” area or zone.

[Based on Harr, M. (n.d.). Smart phone etiquette—How smart are you? Retrieved June 25, 2009, from http://ezinearticles.com]

Zooming In Part 1:
FedEx Office

Critical Thinking

1. In what ways do employee work teams benefit organizations?

Employee work teams benefit organizations by bringing together people with different skill sets to solve problems. Teams may be able to respond faster and make better decisions than individuals. Team members, who may be closer to customers than managers, often bring practical, customer-oriented suggestions for improving productivity. Decisions that are arrived at by teams usually bring greater buy-in than those made by individuals. Organizations also benefit from improved employee morale when teams collaborate to solve problems and boost productivity.

2. Compare and contrast student and corporate work teams. In what ways are they similar and different?

Student and corporate work teams are similar in that both are formed with a purpose. Both usually have members with various skills, and both must learn to work together to achieve their purpose. Both require team members to cooperate and perform in their assigned roles. One major difference is that team members in the workplace are less likely to be tolerated if they fail to perform or if they behave negatively.

3. How could you make a positive contribution to a school or work team?

You can be a good team member by setting rules and abiding by them, analyzing tasks and defining problems, contributing information and ideas, showing interest by listening actively, encouraging members to participate, and synthesizing points of agreement.

Zooming In Part 2:
Fedex Office

Critical Thinking

1. Why do you think workplace meetings are so disliked?

People hate to attend meetings because many are poorly planned and poorly run. They take up a huge amount of time in the workplace, thus preventing attendees from completing tasks that they often feel are more important. Meetings require that attendees listen to others who may be grandstanding, misinformed, or off topic. Meetings swallow chunks of time and may result in nothing concrete or meaningful.

2. Do you think 15-minute stand-up meetings could be effective? Why or why not?

Short stand-up meetings can be effective in achieving specific and usually narrow purposes. They may be less effective in ironing out complex problems and reaching consensus on solutions. The success of any meeting, however, depends largely on the leader and the groundwork laid before the meeting.

3. How can the attitude and behavior of attendees affect the success of a meeting?

If meeting attendees come with an unenthusiastic attitude, refuse to participate, and display negative body language, they will surely generate an unsuccessful meeting. When attendees arrive early, come prepared, and contribute respectfully, they contribute to successful outcomes. It’s wise to remember that in the workplace, meetings are a reality. You can showcase yourself and boost your career by participating professionally and skillfully.

Zooming In, Your Turn:
FedEx Office

Students are asked to prepare a list of suggestions for planning and interacting at virtual meetings. Instructors may also ask that this assignment be submitted as a memo. Shown here is a possible memo.

Date: Current

To: Daryl Thomas, Senior Manager, Sales Development and Education

From: Student’s Name

Subject: Suggestions for Planning Virtual Meetings and Interacting Professionally

As you suggested, I am submitting this memo with suggestions for planning virtual meetings and interacting professionally during the meetings. These suggestions come from textbooks and Internet research into the topic.

Planning Virtual Meetings

· Be sure everyone understands the technology being used and can use it effectively.

· Schedule the meeting at a time convenient to all, regardless of time zones. Avoid spanning a lunch hour, holding someone overtime, or making someone arrive extra early.

· Limit the number participating; usually 12 is the maximum for effective virtual meetings.

· Distribute any documents before the meeting, and be sure participants know how to use online editing tools if documents will be revised.

Participating Professionally

· Take time before the meeting to develop camaraderie with small talk and personal conversation.

· Be precise in presenting ideas; give examples and use simple language.

· Encourage all participants to share in the discussion; don’t have the leader do all the talking.

· Take turns. The microphone usually carries only one voice at a time.

· Identify yourself each time you speak.

· Make your points clearly but politely. Avoid the tendency to be overly frank because you don’t see the other person.

· Do not multitask during virtual meetings.

I hope these suggestions are helpful in planning and conducting virtual meetings. If you would like to discuss these points or if you require further research, I would be happy to do so.

Discussion Material for CAREER COACH:

Listening to Nonnative Speakers in the Workplace

You can have students take part in this discussion in the class as a whole or in small groups made up of both native and nonnative speakers. Encourage students to share their experiences of communicating in a second language, whether here in the U.S. or while traveling to another country. Also encourage students to share their experiences of communicating with a friend or coworker who speaks English as a second language. This discussion can be very eye opening to students, especially those who speak English as their native language. It is also a good introduction to Chapter 3, “Intercultural Communication.”


Discussion Material for CAREER COACH:

Perils of Casual Apparel in the Workplace

Students are asked to debate the proposition that business casual dress be the professional dress standard throughout the United States. To stage a debate, you might wish to follow some of the suggestions made by Dr. James Calvert Scott, “Business Casual Dress,” Part 2, Delta Pi Epsilon Instructional Strategies, December 1999:

Divide your class into small groups of four to six students, each of which is assigned a number. Each group is given a set amount of time to prepare arguments both for and against the debate proposition. Just before the debate begins, each group selects two representatives to serve as its potential debaters. Two numbers are drawn, with the first corresponding group assigned to support the debate proposition and the second corresponding group assigned to oppose the debate proposition for a specified amount of time. The remaining class members serve as neutral judges, who listen carefully to the arguments offered by each debate team. After the presentations, questioning, and rebuttals, the debaters await the decision of the judges. The judges cast their votes in favor of the debate team that presented the more persuasive case. You can increase student involvement in this activity by having multiple groups debate the proposition either sequentially or simultaneously in different parts of the classroom or in a variety of nearby locations.

Discussion Material for ETHICAL INSIGHTS:

Ethical Responsibilities of Group Members and Leaders

Students should enjoy this discussion because it is a common problem when students work as part of a small team in a classroom to complete a problem. Have students brainstorm about this problem in small groups and report their conclusions back to the entire class. Having this discussion early in the semester can help to avoid similar problems during the remainder of the semester.

Discussion Material for Plugged In:

How to Form and Participate in Effective Virtual Teams

Students discuss the reasons that virtual teams are becoming more popular and the advantages and disadvantages of virtual teams for employees and for employers. They may cover some of the following ideas.

· Reasons for Popularity

The technology exists that makes virtual teams possible.
They allow people located anywhere in the world to meet synchronously.

· Advantages and Disadvantages for Employees

Advantages: Meetings can occur at any time that best suits the employees. Employees can engage in meetings with others from around the world without the time and expense of travel. Employees can develop their technology skills.

Disadvantages: Virtual meetings require that employees be excellent online communicators, which is not always the case. Employees may not be properly trained to use the technology. Members may experience feelings of isolation. Depending on the technology used, little or no opportunity to analyze nonverbal communication may exist. Members must work harder to develop understanding, commitment, and trust. Messages may be easily misinterpreted.

· Advantages and Disadvantages for Employers

Advantages: Virtual meetings can be very cost-effective. Since traveling to another physical location is not necessary, employees do not have to be away from their offices. Virtual meetings can result in higher productivity and more motivated employees.

Disadvantages: The initial technology and training costs can be high.

Students may also want to discuss the technological tools that make virtual meetings possible and the requirements for making virtual teams effective.

Ethics Check Solutions

Ethics Check, Page 45

Lazy Team Members, Anyone?

Teamwork is a staple in college classes today and usually works well for students and their instructors. However, occasionally a rogue member will take advantage of a group and barely collaborate. How do you deal with a student who does sloppy work, misses team meetings, and fails to respond to calls or e-mail?

Nonparticipating team members tend to be the most common complaint among students about teamwork. Instructors should establish clear ground rules for dealing with “flaky” group members, but leave the handling of such situations to the team members themselves, so that they may learn how to deal with difficult participants. A gradual approach should be encouraged ranging from warnings to action that is more serious. For instance, a smart policy is to allow the team to “fire” a noncompliant member who then has to work on another project by himself or herself. Gauging the state of the collaboration by asking students to fill out a confidential “teamwork evaluation form” is also helpful. Finally, the larger the student team, the more likely it becomes that someone will ride on the group’s coat tails. Hence, it’s a good idea to limit team size to 3–4 members. From the beginning, instructors should emphasize to students who form teams of three, for example, that their responsibility for the final document is 300, not 33.3 percent.

Ethics Check, Page 64

Impressing Your Instructor

Projecting a professional image begins in your business communication classroom and in other courses where your instructors evaluate your work and your participation. Imagine how a professor perceives students who skip classes, arrive late, forget homework, yawn with their tonsils showing, chew gum or eat, and doodle during class. What message does such nonverbal behavior send?

Even if told repeatedly, students often don’t make the connection between behavioral guidelines they read about in their textbooks and their own practice in the classroom. They also tend to forget that they are being watched and evaluated as they will be in the workplace. Although the classroom is a training ground simulating workplace requirements and behavior, it ought to be taken seriously as a professional environment. Naturally, this means that instructors themselves need to lead by example.

Photo Essay Solution

Photo Essay, Page 40

Saving lives requires effective teamwork, and the emergency watercraft teams involved in 2009’s “Miracle on the Hudson” included FDNY firefighters, NYPD police, Coast Guard personnel, and ferryboat captains. These rescuers were highly trained for water rescue and followed familiar procedures routinely rehearsed in rescue drills. In addition, the team members accepted shared leadership and displayed a strong sense of collaboration, not competition.

Video Resources

Instructors may also show the Bridging the Gap video from Video Library 2, Understanding Teamwork: Cold Stone Creamery. Instructors will find a complete discussion guide and activity solution for this video presented in this Instructor’s Manual.

Chapter Presentation Ideas and Extras

For instructors who have extra class time, we provide the following activity ideas.

1. Long-Term Group Roles. To help your students gain a sense of the roles group members can play in a long-term project or task force, you may give them the following guides:

TEAM PROJECT: JOB DESCRIPTIONS

1. Manager, small group dynamics expert

Conducts meetings effectively

Delegates work appropriately and fairly

E-mails the CEO (instructor) as required with team progress report or agenda and minutes

Sets and distributes agenda

Attends and contributes at all group meetings

Participates effectively at group presentations

Completes group assessment documents competently

Follows up on group decisions

2. Assistant Manager, small group dynamics expert

Fills in for the manager

Secures meeting rooms in a timely fashion

Informs members of changes in a timely fashion

Assists manager as needed, especially in following up group decisions

Collects and distributes minutes

Attends and contributes at all group meetings

Participates effectively at group presentations

Completes group assessment documents competently

3. Document Expert, word processing expert

Prepares final copies of documents effectively and on time

Collects copies of all group documents and files

Instructs group in word processing as needed

Attends and contributes at all group meetings

Participates effectively at group presentations

Completes group assessment documents competently

4. Multimedia Specialist, presentation software expert

Prepares audio-visual projects effectively and on time

Collects copies of all presentation software documents and files

Instructs group in presentation software as needed

Attends and contributes at all group meetings

Participates effectively at group presentations

Completes group assessment documents competently

5. Senior Researcher, print, Internet, electronic research expert

Organizes research projects effectively and on time

Ensures that research documents and files have appropriate formatting

Instructs group in research methods as needed

Attends and contributes at all group meetings

Participates effectively at group presentations

Completes group assessment documents competently

2. Short-Term Group Roles. When placing students in small, temporary groups in the classroom, assign them the following roles. Encourage students to adopt different roles in different groups or to rotate roles.

SMALL GROUP ROLES

1. Facilitator

Gets the task at hand or project started

Keeps group focused on the purpose

Keeps meeting running smoothly

Keeps members on task

2. Recordkeeper
Keeps a recording of the meeting
Reports the results of the group to the rest of the class


3. Timekeeper
Keeps track of time during the meeting
Helps facilitator keep meeting on track
Ends meeting on time

4. Encourager
Makes sure that all members are participating
Helps members deal with conflicts

3. Parliamentary Procedure. To help your students learn how to effectively manage and take place in productive meetings, you should introduce them to the basics of parliamentary procedure. Share the following the guidelines with them:

Minimum Guidelines for Using Parliamentary Procedure

Running Meetings

1. Call meeting to order.

2. Read minutes of last meeting.

3. Hear reports of treasurer and other officers.

4. Process committee reports.

5. Consider old business.

6. Entertain new business.

7. Introduce program for meeting.

8. Adjourn meeting.

Making Decisions

1. Chair entertains new business in the form of main motion.

2. Member seconds main motion.

3. Main motion is debated with chair controlling discussion.

4. Chair calls for a vote.

5. Motion passes or is defeated.

Protecting Individual Rights

1. Appoint a knowledgeable, objective parliamentarian to enforce the rules.

2. Rise to a point of information if you do not understand discussion at hand.

3. Rise to a point of parliamentary inquiry to ask the parliamentarian about correct procedures.

4. Call for a division of the house if a voice vote is unclear.

5. Appeal the decision of the chair and ask members to vote on whether the chair is right.


GUIDES FOR AGENDAS AND MINUTES

Agenda

1. Specify date, place, starting time, and ending time.

2. Provide a statement of overall mission and purpose of the meeting.

3. Identify who will attend.

4. List the topics to be covered.

5. Identify the approximate amount of time for each topic.

6. Identify the premeeting action or reading expected of each member.

7. Distribute the agenda at least a week ahead of time.

Minutes

1. Provide date, time, and location of the meeting.

2. Maintain an objective tone (no editorializing).

3. Summarize when possible.

4. Express motions and amendments precisely.

5. Record time of adjournment, and if appropriate, the time of the next meeting.

4. Class Discussion Board. If you have set up an online discussion board for your class, set up private topic areas for the groups in your class. Here group members can asynchronously discuss group projects and other class assignments among themselves, without the entire class seeing their postings. These private areas also allow an excellent area for group members to share documents with each other outside of class. (See The Technology Link, Chapter 1, for information on discussion boards.)

5. Listening and Nonverbal Communication Exercise. The following paper-tearing activity is an interesting way to illustrate how important visual cues are in communicating. Which is more important—visual or spoken messages? What causes miscommunication?

Directions

Ask students to take a sheet of notebook paper (or distribute sheets of 8 1/2 × 11‑inch paper). Tell students to follow four simple instructions—without looking at what anyone else is doing. Give the following instructions, and carry them out yourself. Pause just long enough after each command so that students can perform the action.

1. Fold your sheet of paper in half. Tear off the upper right-hand corner.

2. Fold it in half again, and tear off the upper left-hand corner. Fold it in half again, and tear off the lower right-hand corner.

When finished, ask students to hold up their sheets. Show yours as well. (By the way, your sheet will be most dramatic if you tear through several thicknesses with each corner tear command.) After observing the varying results of such simple instructions, lead a discussion focused on the causes of miscommunication. You might begin by saying, “If I’m a good communicator and you’re good listeners, our sheets should all be the same. Right?”

What caused the miscommunication? Who is to blame? How could this communication transaction have been improved? To relate this exercise to the workplace, ask how managers giving instructions could improve the likelihood of success. How might listeners improve their comprehension? How should communicators react when miscommunication occurs? Who should be blamed?

Source: “Paper-Tearing Trick Teaches Lesson,” The Prior Report, July 1992, p. 1.


[i] Coutu, D., & Beschloss, M. (2009, May). Why teams don’t work. Harvard Business Review, (87), 5, 98-105. Retrieved June 1, 2009, from Business Source Complete database.

Chapter 2—Professionalism: Team, Meeting, Listening, Nonverbal, and Etiquette Skills

MULTIPLE CHOICE

1. Which of the following is an example of a soft skill?

a.

Being able to work well as part of a team

b.

Knowing how to engage in appropriate small talk at a business social function

c.

Having good listening proficiency

d.

All of these choices

ANS: D

Feedback

A

All of these¾being able to work well as part of a team, knowing how to engage in appropriate small talk at a business social function, and having good listening proficiency¾are examples of soft skills. Other soft skills include oral and written communication skills, appropriate nonverbal behavior, and proper business etiquette.

B

All of these¾being able to work well as part of a team, knowing how to engage in appropriate small talk at a business social function, and having good listening proficiency¾are examples of soft skills. Other soft skills include oral and written communication skills, appropriate nonverbal behavior, and proper business etiquette.

C

All of these¾being able to work well as part of a team, knowing how to engage in appropriate small talk at a business social function, and having good listening proficiency¾are examples of soft skills. Other soft skills include oral and written communication skills, appropriate nonverbal behavior, and proper business etiquette.

D

All of these¾being able to work well as part of a team, knowing how to engage in appropriate small talk at a business social function, and having good listening proficiency¾are examples of soft skills. Other soft skills include oral and written communication skills, appropriate nonverbal behavior, and proper business etiquette.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 39 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion

TOP: Becoming a Team Player in Professional Groups TYP: Conceptual

2. Alexandra knows that her soft skills will be evaluated during her job interview. Which of the following skills should she practice to prepare for her interview?

a.

Shaking hands appropriately

b.

Exhibiting posture that shows confidence and professionalism

c.

Speaking clearly and giving concise answers to interview questions

d.

All of these choices

ANS: D

Feedback

A

Etiquette expertise, nonverbal behavior, and oral communication skills are all examples of soft skills.

B

Etiquette expertise, nonverbal behavior, and oral communication skills are all examples of soft skills.

C

Etiquette expertise, nonverbal behavior, and oral communication skills are all examples of soft skills.

D

Etiquette expertise, nonverbal behavior, and oral communication skills are all examples of soft skills.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 39 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis

TOP: Becoming a Team Player in Professional Groups TYP: Application

3. Organizations form teams because teams are able to respond faster, demonstrate increased productivity, and

a.

are used extensively in every culture.

b.

are proficient in using technology.

c.

experience less hostility among team members.

d.

make better decisions.

ANS: D

Feedback

A

Although teams are used extensively throughout the world, they are not used in every culture.

B

Although team members may be proficient in using technology, that does not explain why organizations form teams.

C

Hostility among team members has nothing to do with the motivation for organizations to form teams.

D

One of the principal reasons that organizations form teams is that decisions made by teams are more accurate and effective because group members contribute different expertise and perspective.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 40-41 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams TYP: Conceptual

4. Eric is part of a team developing a new product idea aimed at a specific target market. Because team members are located throughout the country, they don't meet in person. Instead, they use communication technology to collaborate on the project. Because members use technology to stay connected, Eric is part of a

a.

group.

b.

cross-functional team.

c.

virtual team.

d.

self-directed team.

ANS: C

Feedback

A

Eric and his colleagues are considered to be a virtual team, whose members use the Web and other communication technologies to help them exchange ideas; make decisions; and stay connected across space, time, and organization boundaries.

B

Eric and his colleagues are considered to be a virtual team, whose members use the Web and other communication technologies to help them exchange ideas; make decisions; and stay connected across space, time, and organization boundaries.

C

Eric and his colleagues are considered to be a virtual team, whose members use the Web and other communication technologies to help them exchange ideas; make decisions; and stay connected across space, time, and organization boundaries.

D

Eric and his colleagues are considered to be a virtual team, whose members use the Web and other communication technologies to help them exchange ideas; make decisions; and stay connected across space, time, and organization boundaries.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 41 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams

TYP: Application

5. A task force charged with reducing overhead costs meets to define their roles and responsibilities and ways to reach the group's goals. Tension is fairly high among group members. The team is in the ____ phase of team development.

a.

forming

b.

storming

c.

norming

d.

performing

ANS: B

Feedback

A

During the forming phase of team development, individuals get to know each other.

B

In the storming phase of team development, members define their roles and responsibilities and often encounter conflict and tension.

C

When teams overcome initial tension and sort out their roles, they have progressed to the norming stage.

D

In the performing phase of team development, team members learn to share information and work together unhindered by conflicts.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 43 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams TYP: Application

6. A committee has been formed to rewrite the company's mission statement. The committee members are just starting to get to know one another and are attempting to bond. What phase of team development are they experiencing?

a.

Forming

b.

Storming

c.

Norming

d.

Performing

ANS: A

Feedback

A

During the forming phase of team development, individuals get to know each other.

B

In the storming phase of team development, members define their roles and responsibilities and often encounter conflict.

C

In the norming phase of team development, roles clarify and information begins to flow among members.

D

In the performing phase of team development, team members learn to share information and work together unhindered by conflicts.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 43 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams TYP: Application

7. The most effective groups and teams have members who are willing to

a.

establish rules and abide by those rules.

b.

do everything necessary to avoid conflict.

c.

use e-mail and other technology to communicate.

d.

let the group leader make all decisions.

ANS: A

Feedback

A

The most effective groups have members who are willing to establish rules and abide by those rules.

B

The most effective groups have members who are willing to establish rules and abide by those rules.

C

The most effective groups have members who are willing to establish rules and abide by those rules.

D

The most effective groups have members who are willing to establish rules and abide by those rules.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 44 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Conceptual

8. Hannah has just been appointed to a committee and wants to be a positive member. Which of the following is the best advice you can give her?

a.

Ignore members who are being silent to show respect for them.

b.

Tell a lot of jokes throughout the meeting to ease tensions.

c.

Share her ideas with other team members, even if they might not be adopted.

d.

Hannah should do all of these.

ANS: C

Feedback

A

Encouraging quiet members to participate is positive team behavior.

B

Excessive joke-telling is negative team behavior.

C

Contributing information and ideas is positive team behavior.

D

Contributing information and ideas and encouraging quiet team members to participate are positive team behaviors, but excessive joke-telling is negative team behavior.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 44 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Application

9. Which of the following statements about conflict is most accurate?

a.

Conflict is a normal part of every workplace and every team.

b.

Even when managed properly, conflict decreases group cohesiveness and increases tensions.

c.

Conflict should be avoided because it destroys morale and reduces productivity.

d.

Conflict is always negative.

ANS: A

Feedback

A

Conflict is a normal part of every workplace and every team.

B

When managed properly, conflict can actually improve decision-making, clarify values, increase group cohesiveness, stimulate creativity, decrease tensions, and reduce dissatisfaction.

C

Although unresolved conflict can destroy morale and reduce productivity, conflict itself should not be avoided because, when managed properly, it can improve group performance.

D

Conflict is not always negative.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 44 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Conceptual

10. During a meeting Matthew and Jennifer get into an argument about how to prepare a proposal. What is the first step they should take to try to resolve this conflict?

a.

Look for common ground.

b.

Understand the other's point of view.

c.

Listen carefully to make sure they understand the problem.

d.

Show concern for the relationship.

ANS: C

Feedback

A

The first step in the six-step procedure for dealing with conflict is to listen to make sure that you understand the problem.

B

The first step in the six-step procedure for dealing with conflict is to listen to make sure that you understand the problem.

C

The first step in the six-step procedure for dealing with conflict is to listen to make sure that you understand the problem.

D

The first step in the six-step procedure for dealing with conflict is to listen to make sure that you understand the problem.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 44 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Application

11. Raymond has been appointed team leader of a group that will develop his company's five-year strategic plan. He wants to ensure that his team avoids groupthink. What should he do?

a.

Choose team members with similar backgrounds.

b.

Develop systematic procedures for the team to follow.

c.

Demand that his team make decisions quickly.

d.

Make sure his team knows what outcomes he favors.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Having team members with similar backgrounds can lead to groupthink.

B

Having systematic procedures can help a team avoid groupthink.

C

Demanding quick decisions can lead to groupthink.

D

Having a strong leader who favors specific outcomes can lead to groupthink.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 45 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Application

12. A team must decide whether to adopt a new procedure for submitting expense claims. Team members have decided to continue their discussion until all team members have aired their opinions and, ultimately, agree. What method for reaching group decisions is this team using?

a.

Majority

b.

Consensus

c.

Authority rule with discussion

d.

Averaging

ANS: B

Feedback

A

When using the majority method, group members vote and a majority wins. This group is using the consensus method, which requires all group members to reach agreement.

B

This group is using the consensus method, which requires all group members to reach agreement.

C

Authority rule with discussion allows group members to voice their opinions but leaves the final decision to the group leader. This group is using the consensus method, which requires all group members to reach agreement.

D

Averaging requires that all team members haggle, bargain, cajole, and negotiate to reach a middle position. This group is using the consensus method, which requires all group members to reach agreement.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 45 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Application

13. A team of top-level executives is rewriting the company's bylaws. Because this decision will have far-reaching and long-term effects, members want to have the most creative, high-quality discussion possible. What group decision-making method should they use?

a.

Majority

b.

Consensus

c.

Authority rule with discussion

d.

Averaging

ANS: B

Feedback

A

With consensus the discussion continues until all team members have aired their opinions and, ultimately, agree. Although time-consuming, this group decision-making method produces the most creative, high-quality discussion.

B

With consensus the discussion continues until all team members have aired their opinions and, ultimately, agree. Although time-consuming, this group decision-making method produces the most creative, high-quality discussion.

C

With consensus the discussion continues until all team members have aired their opinions and, ultimately, agree. Although time-consuming, this group decision-making method produces the most creative, high-quality discussion.

D

With consensus the discussion continues until all team members have aired their opinions and, ultimately, agree. Although time-consuming, this group decision-making method produces the most creative, high-quality discussion.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 45 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Application

14. Nadia is putting together a team to brainstorm product development ideas. Because she wants her team to be successful, the team should

a.

be as homogeneous as possible.

b.

develop procedures to guide them.

c.

avoid conflict.

d.

be as large as possible, with at least ten members.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

The most creative teams are composed of male and female members who differ in age, ethnicity, social background, training, and experience.

B

The best teams develop procedures to guide them.

C

Poorly functioning teams avoid conflict, preferring sulking, gossiping, or backstabbing.

D

A team with four or five members is optimal for many projects; larger groups have trouble interacting constructively.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 46-48 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Application

15. Sarah has agreed to be a team leader in her organization and wants to make sure that the team is ethically responsible. What advice would you give her?

a.

Make sure that the team represents her organization's view.

b.

Respect the organization's privileged information.

c.

Avoid advocating actions that would endanger members of society at large.

d.

Sarah should do all of these as team leader.

ANS: D

Feedback

A

Sarah should do all of these¾make sure that the team represents her organization's views, respect the organization's privileged information, and avoid advocating actions that would endanger members of society at large.

B

Sarah should do all of these¾make sure that the team represents her organization's views, respect the organization's privileged information, and avoid advocating actions that would endanger members of society at large.

C

Sarah should do all of these¾make sure that the team represents her organization's views, respect the organization's privileged information, and avoid advocating actions that would endanger members of society at large.

D

Sarah should do all of these¾make sure that the team represents her organization's views, respect the organization's privileged information, and avoid advocating actions that would endanger members of society at large.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 48 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork | AACSB: Tier 1 - Ethics | AACSB: Tier 2 - Personal, Corporate, Legal, Ethical responsibilities TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior

TYP: Application

16. Select the most accurate statement about meetings.

a.

Most people look forward to meetings.

b.

Meetings should be viewed as opportunities to demonstrate leadership, communication, and problem-solving skills.

c.

Because of advances in technology, the number of face-to-face business meetings is declining rapidly.

d.

Meetings are an excellent way to communicate information that does not require immediate feedback.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Many people think meetings waste time and accomplish nothing.

B

Although meetings are often time-consuming, they can also be looked upon as opportunities to demonstrate leadership, communication, and problem-solving skills.

C

As business becomes more team-oriented and management becomes more participatory, people are attending more meetings than ever.

D

E-mail messages, memos, or letters should be used to communicate information that does not require immediate feedback.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 48-49 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

17. Allan manages the Human Resources Department for his company. The due dates for payroll reports will be changing slightly, and he needs to communicate this information to all company managers. Allan should

a.

send an e-mail or text message to inform the management staff.

b.

prepare an agenda and call a meeting.

c.

consult key people to help him decide whether to call a meeting.

d.

use the grapevine to convey the message.

ANS: A

Feedback

A

Meetings should not be called to distribute information. An e-mail or text message would be most efficient to inform managers.

B

Meetings should not be called to distribute information. An e-mail or text message would be most efficient to inform managers.

C

Meetings should not be called to distribute information. An e-mail or text message would be most efficient to inform managers.

D

Meetings should not be called to distribute information. An e-mail or text message would be most efficient to inform managers.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 49 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Asynchronous messaging

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Application

18. Tracey is planning a meeting to develop a new procedure for handling employee grievances. How many participants should she invite?

a.

At least one representing each of the company's 16 departments

b.

Five or fewer

c.

Ten or fewer

d.

30 or fewer

ANS: B

Feedback

A

When decisions need to be made, the best number is five or fewer participants.

B

When decisions need to be made, the best number is five or fewer participants.

C

When decisions need to be made, the best number is five or fewer participants.

D

When decisions need to be made, the best number is five or fewer participants.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 49 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Application

19. Which of the following statements about meeting agendas is most accurate?

a.

An agenda of meeting topics should be distributed at least ten days before the meeting.

b.

An agenda should include as many items as necessary to accomplish your purpose.

c.

An agenda should not include an allotment of time for each agenda item because doing so can make a meeting too regimented.

d.

The agenda should include any premeeting preparation expected of participants.

ANS: D

Feedback

A

At least two days in advance of a meeting, distribute an agenda of topics to be discussed.

B

To keep meetings productive, limit the number of agenda items.

C

An agenda should include a proposed time allotment for each item.

D

An agenda should include any reports or materials that participants should read in advance.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 50 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

20. Deborah will be leading a committee meeting and wants to make sure it is effective and efficient. What should Deborah do to get the meeting started?

a.

Wait until all participants arrive before beginning the meeting.

b.

Give a quick recap to anyone who arrives late.

c.

Go over ground rules at the beginning of the meeting.

d.

Deborah should do all of these.

ANS: C

Feedback

A

Meetings should start on time even if some participants are missing.

B

To avoid resentment, don't give a quick recap to anyone arriving late.

C

Deborah should open the meeting with a three- to five-minute introduction that includes the ground rules to be covered.

D

Deborah should open the meeting with a three- to five-minute introduction that includes the ground rules to be covered.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 51 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Application

21. Sandra is leading a meeting and wants to make sure that they stick to the agenda and end on time. What should she do to move the meeting along?

a.

As the leader, she should say as much as possible during the meeting.

b.

Generate a list of important but divergent topics that should be discussed later.

c.

Not worry so much about time; the most important thing is to make sure that all agenda items are discussed fully.

d.

Kick anyone out who monopolizes the conversation.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

The leader should say as little as possible during the meeting.

B

Sandra should generate a "Parking List" list, which is a list of important but divergent topics that should be discussed later.

C

It is important to adhere to the agenda and the time schedule.

D

Sandra should deal tactfully with anyone who is monopolizing the conversation, but she should not remove the person from the meeting.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 52 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Application

22. Miguel has been invited to attend his first sales meeting and wants to be an active and productive member from the very beginning. Which of the following should he do to make a good impression?

a.

Keep his cell phone on so that he doesn't miss an important call during the meeting.

b.

Come prepared to the meeting by doing any preliminary work required.

c.

Use body language to show whether he's bored; the meeting leader will appreciate his honesty.

d.

Wait to share his views after the meeting so that the meeting can move along efficiently.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Cell phones should be turned off during meetings so that participants can pay attention.

B

Come prepared to a meeting by doing any preliminary work and studying the agenda.

C

Participants should use positive body language during a meeting.

D

It's important to express your views in the meeting, not after.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 52 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

23. Which of the following statements about ending a meeting is most accurate?

a.

The meeting should not end until all agenda items have been fully discussed.

b.

If minutes are taken, they should be distributed at the next meeting.

c.

Because all participants should be responsible for paying attention during the meeting, a summary at the end of the meeting would be a waste of time.

d.

No one should leave the meeting without a full understanding of what was accomplished.

ANS: D

Feedback

A

Meetings should end on time, even if all agenda items have not yet been discussed.

B

If minutes are taken, they should be distributed within a couple of days after the meeting.

C

At the end of the meeting, the leader should summarize what has been decided, discuss action items, and establish a schedule for completion.

D

No one should leave the meeting without a full understanding of what was accomplished.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 52-53 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

24. Which of the following statements about virtual meetings is most accurate?

a.

Virtual meetings are rare in today's workplace.

b.

It is almost impossible to exchange ideas, brainstorm, build consensus, or develop personal relationships virtually.

c.

Two of the most significant reasons for the shift to virtual meetings are saving travel costs and reducing employee fatigue.

d.

Virtual meetings are generally held to coordinate team activities but not for any other purposes.

ANS: C

Feedback

A

One of the major trends in today's workplace is the rise of virtual meetings instead of face-to-face meetings.

B

Instead of meeting face-to-face, people in today's workplaces have found ways to exchange ideas, brainstorm, build consensus, and develop personal relationships virtually.

C

Saving travel costs and reducing employee fatigue are significant reasons for shifting to virtual meetings.

D

Virtual meetings have many purposes, including training employees, making sales presentations, coordinating team activities, and talking with customers.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 53 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

25. Angelina uses her computer to access an online meeting room where she takes part in meetings with her department members. In this meeting room, participants are able to present PowerPoint slides and Word documents, share spreadsheets, demonstrate products, visit Web pages, and use a white board. Angelina and her colleagues are using what type of collaboration technology?

a.

Audioconferencing

b.

Web conferencing

c.

Instant messaging

d.

A blog

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Audioconferencing involves one or two people who confer with others by telephone. Angelina and her colleagues are using Web conferencing.

B

Angelina and her colleagues are using Web conferencing.

C

Instant messaging allows users to deliver messages immediately and directly to the receiver's desktop. Angelina and her colleagues are using Web conferencing.

D

A blog is an interactive online journal. Angelina and her colleagues are using Web conferencing.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 54-55 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Definition

26. Devon is responsible for planning a virtual meeting. What should he do before the meeting takes place to ensure that it is productive?

a.

Make sure the technology being used is accessible to all meeting participants.

b.

Set the meeting time using Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

c.

Encourage members to log on 15 minutes early.

d.

Devon should do all of these.

ANS: D

Feedback

A

Devon should do all of these¾make sure the technology is accessible to all meeting participants, set the meeting time using UTC, and encourage members to log on 15 minutes early. In addition, he should provide any necessary training, decide what language will be used, and distribute any materials that will be shared.

B

Devon should do all of these¾make sure the technology is accessible to all meeting participants, set the meeting time using UTC, and encourage members to log on 15 minutes early. In addition, he should provide any necessary training, decide what language will be used, and distribute any materials that will be shared.

C

Devon should do all of these¾make sure the technology is accessible to all meeting participants, set the meeting time using UTC, and encourage members to log on 15 minutes early. In addition, he should provide any necessary training, decide what language will be used, and distribute any materials that will be shared.

D

Devon should do all of these¾make sure the technology is accessible to all meeting participants, set the meeting time using UTC, and encourage members to log on 15 minutes early. In addition, he should provide any necessary training, decide what language will be used, and distribute any materials that will be shared.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 56 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

27. Elizabeth will be taking charge of her first virtual meeting. What should she do to make sure all participants are collaborating successfully during the meeting?

a.

Use complex language to get her points across.

b.

When presenting, she should project an upbeat, enthusiastic, strong voice.

c.

Do most of the talking to reduce confusion.

d.

Ask leading questions such as "Does everyone agree?" to keep the meeting moving along.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Elizabeth should be as precise as possible, giving examples and using simple language.

B

Without eye contact and nonverbal cues, the best way to keep the attention of the audience is through a powerful voice.

C

Participants will lose interest if the leader is the only one talking; therefore, Elizabeth should encourage dialogue by asking questions of specific people.

D

Leaders should avoid asking leading questions such as "Does everyone agree?"

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 57-58 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

28. Which of the following statements about listening is most accurate?

a.

Listening is a hard skill that employers seek when looking for well-rounded candidates who can be hired and promoted.

b.

Three quarters of high-quality communication involves listening.

c.

Everyone knows how to listen because listening is an automatic response to noise.

d.

Listening skills become less important as one moves up the career ladder.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Listening is a soft skill, not a hard skill.

B

Three quarters of high-quality communication involves listening.

C

Listening is not an automatic response to noise.

D

Good listeners make good managers, and good listeners advance more rapidly in their organizations. Executives can spend 60 to 70 percent of their communication time

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 58 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

29. Experts say that we ignore, forget, distort, or misunderstand

a.

less than 10 percent of everything we hear.

b.

25 percent of everything we hear.

c.

50 percent of everything we hear.

d.

75 percent of everything we hear.

ANS: D

Feedback

A

Experts say that we listen at only 25 percent efficiency. In other words, we ignore, forget, distort, or misunderstand 75 percent of everything we hear.

B

Experts say that we listen at only 25 percent efficiency. In other words, we ignore, forget, distort, or misunderstand 75 percent of everything we hear.

C

Experts say that we listen at only 25 percent efficiency. In other words, we ignore, forget, distort, or misunderstand 75 percent of everything we hear.

D

Experts say that we listen at only 25 percent efficiency. In other words, we ignore, forget, distort, or misunderstand 75 percent of everything we hear.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 58 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

30. Several factors may cause poor listening habits. Which of the following is not one of these factors?

a.

Lack of training

b.

Large number of competing sounds and stimuli in our lives

c.

Physical hearing disability

d.

Ability to process speech faster than others can speak

ANS: C

Feedback

A

Factors that lead to ineffective listening skills include lack of training, the large number of competing sounds and stimuli in our lives, and the ability to process speech faster than others can speak.

B

Factors that lead to ineffective listening skills include lack of training, the large number of competing sounds and stimuli in our lives, and the ability to process speech faster than others can speak.

C

Factors that lead to ineffective listening skills include lack of training, the large number of competing sounds and stimuli in our lives, and the ability to process speech faster than others can speak.

D

Factors that lead to ineffective listening skills include lack of training, the large number of competing sounds and stimuli in our lives, and the ability to process speech faster than others can speak.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 58 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

31. Jonathan was just hired as a human resources assistant and wants to make a good impression in his new position. What should he do when listening to his supervisor?

a.

Don't ask questions because doing so may make him look ignorant.

b.

Show his interest by leaning forward and striving for good eye contact.

c.

Feel free to answer the phone if he receives a call to show how busy he is.

d.

Rely on his memory for the details rather than take notes to show how sharp he is.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Don't be afraid to ask pertinent or even "dumb" questions if they ensure your completing a job correctly the first time.

B

A listener can show interest in what the speaker has to say by leaning forward slightly and maintaining good eye contact.

C

Don't be tempted to answer phone calls or to complete another task while listening to another person.

D

Take notes rather than rely on your memory.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 59 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Application

32. Christina spends a lot of time listening to her colleagues during meetings. Because she must remember what they say, she is always careful to identify main ideas and recognize the purpose of their messages. Christina is engaging in

a.

discriminative listening.

b.

critical listening.

c.

lag time.

d.

efficiency listening.

ANS: A

Feedback

A

Christina is engaging in discriminative listening, which enables her to understand and remember what she is hearing. When engaging in discriminative listening, you must identify main ideas, understand logical arguments, and recognize the purpose of the message.

B

Christina is engaging in discriminative listening, which enables her to understand and remember what she is hearing. When engaging in discriminative listening, you must identify main ideas, understand logical arguments, and recognize the purpose of the message.

C

Christina is engaging in discriminative listening, which enables her to understand and remember what she is hearing. When engaging in discriminative listening, you must identify main ideas, understand logical arguments, and recognize the purpose of the message.

D

Christina is engaging in discriminative listening, which enables her to understand and remember what she is hearing. When engaging in discriminative listening, you must identify main ideas, understand logical arguments, and recognize the purpose of the message.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 59 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Application

33. Which of the following statements about listening to customers is least accurate?

a.

Listening to customers can result in increased sales and profitability.

b.

Companies should hire employees who already possess good listening skills because training employees in this area is usually ineffective.

c.

As the U.S. economy becomes increasingly service oriented, customer service becomes even more important.

d.

Listening can be a strong customer acquisition and retention tool.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Listening to customers can result in increased sales and profitability.

B

Although smart companies begin by hiring employees who genuinely care about customers, organizations also train their employees to listen actively and to ask gentle, probing questions to ensure clear understanding.

C

As the U.S. economy becomes increasingly service oriented, customer service becomes even more important.

D

Listening is an acknowledgment of caring and is a potent customer acquisition and retention tool.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 59 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

34. Cameron is a customer service representative and has just gone through training to improve his listening skills. Which of the following skills was he most likely taught that will make him a better listener?

a.

Mentally criticize grammar, voice, tone, and speaking style to get a better sense of what the customer is like.

b.

If you already know what the answer is, you can tune out some of what the customer is saying.

c.

Remain silent for a few seconds after a customer finishes to be sure the thought is completed.

d.

Because listening is automatic, you can divide your attention among two or more tasks to be more productive.

ANS: C

Feedback

A

Trained listeners pay most attention to content, not to surface issues such as grammar, voice, tone, and speaking style.

B

Trained listeners defer judgment and listen completely, trying to understand every nuance of what the customer is saying.

C

Trained listeners remain silent for a few minutes after a customer finishes to be sure the thought is completed.

D

Trained listeners do one thing at a time, realizing that listening is a full-time job.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 60-62 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Application

35. Molly wants to become a better listener in the workplace. Which of the following is the best technique she can do to improve her listening skills?

a.

Don't maintain direct eye contact because doing so may distract the speaker.

b.

Interrupt whenever she has an opinion on the topic to share with her speaker.

c.

Rephrase and summarize the speaker's message in her own words.

d.

Avoid asking any questions because doing so may distract the speaker.

ANS: C

Feedback

A

Show that you are listening closely by leaning forward and maintaining eye contact with the speaker.

B

While someone else is speaking, don't interrupt with a quick reply or opinion.

C

To make sure you understand a speaker, rephrase and summarize a message in your own words.

D

Good listeners wait for the proper moment and then ask questions.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 60-62 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Application

36. In listening to nonnative speakers in the workplace, you should not show impatience, finish sentences, judge accented speech negatively, or

a.

correct grammar and pronunciation.

b.

smile or maintain eye contact.

c.

tell the speaker you're having trouble understanding,

d.

all of these choices.

ANS: A

Feedback

A

Listening to nonnative speakers requires patience and the willingness to avoid judging accented speech negatively, as well as avoiding pretending to listen. It's perfectly all right to tell a speaker that you're having a little difficulty understanding.

B

Listening to nonnative speakers requires patience and the willingness to avoid judging accented speech negatively, as well as avoiding pretending to listen. It's perfectly all right to tell a speaker that you're having a little difficulty understanding.

C

Listening to nonnative speakers requires patience and the willingness to avoid judging accented speech negatively, as well as avoiding pretending to listen. It's perfectly all right to tell a speaker that you're having a little difficulty understanding.

D

Listening to nonnative speakers requires patience and the willingness to avoid judging accented speech negatively, as well as avoiding pretending to listen. It's perfectly all right to tell a speaker that you're having a little difficulty understanding.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 61 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns | AACSB: Tier 1 - Diversity | AACSB: Tier 2 - Cultural imperatives TOP: Listening in the Workplace TYP: Conceptual

37. Which of the following is not a form of nonverbal communication?

a.

The appearance of a business document

b.

Showing up late for a job interview

c.

The adjectives used in a sales letter

d.

Raising one's voice when angry or frustrated

ANS: C

Feedback

A

The appearance of a business document sends a nonverbal message.

B

Showing up late for a job interview sends a nonverbal message.

C

The adjectives used in a sales letter send a verbal message.

D

Raising one's voice when angry or frustrated sends a nonverbal message.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 64-67 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Conceptual

38. Isabella has a habit of giving a thumbs-up sign every time she agrees with something. This functions as what type of nonverbal message?

a.

To complement and illustrate

b.

To replace and substitute

c.

To control and regulate

d.

To reinforce and accentuate

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Giving a thumbs-up sign to show agreement functions as a way to replace and substitute.

B

Giving a thumbs-up sign to show agreement functions as a way to replace and substitute.

C

Giving a thumbs-up sign to show agreement functions as a way to replace and substitute.

D

Giving a thumbs-up sign to show agreement functions as a way to replace and substitute.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 63 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Application

39. Jose is describing his new iPhone and uses his thumb and forefinger to demonstrate how thin it is. Jose's action functions to

a.

complement and illustrate.

b.

replace and substitute.

c.

control and regulate the situation.

d.

contradict.

ANS: A

Feedback

A

Jose's gesture is used to complement and illustrate by providing details for a verbal message.

B

Jose's gesture is used to complement and illustrate by providing details for a verbal message.

C

Jose's gesture is used to complement and illustrate by providing details for a verbal message.

D

Jose's gesture is used to complement and illustrate by providing details for a verbal message.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 63 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Application

40. Select the most accurate statement about eye contact.

a.

Communicators consider the eyes to be the most accurate predictor of a speaker's true feelings and attitudes.

b.

Nonverbal cues, including eye contact, have identical meanings in most cultures.

c.

Sustained eye contact signifies fear or stress.

d.

Eye contact cannot be learned; it's an innate trait.

ANS: A

Feedback

A

Communicators consider the eyes to be the most accurate predictor of a speaker's true feelings and attitudes.

B

Use of eye contact conveys different meanings in different cultures.

C

Sustained eye contact suggests trust and admiration; brief eye contact signifies fear or stress.

D

Eye contact is a learned skill.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 64 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Conceptual

41. Which of the following statements about nonverbal communication is the least accurate?

a.

Very few people can control their facial expressions well enough to control the nonverbal messages they send.

b.

Standing up straight can make a person look arrogant.

c.

The way you organize your office tells others something about you and your objectives.

d.

Arriving late repeatedly to meetings can communicate that you are self-centered or have little self-discipline.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Few people can control their facial expressions well enough to control the nonverbal messages they send.

B

Erect posture sends a message of confidence, competence, diligence, and strength.

C

How we arrange objects in the space around us tells others something about us and our objectives.

D

If you arrive late repeatedly to meetings, you may be communicating that you are self-centered, give the meeting low priority, or have little self-discipline.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 64-65 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Conceptual

42. When your department head Ms. Kruse arranges chairs informally in a circle during a meeting, what kind of message is she sending?

a.

A nonverbal message that she is encouraging an open, egalitarian exchange of ideas

b.

A nonverbal message that she prefers to be separated from others

c.

A nonverbal and verbal message regarding her aloofness and preference for restricted communication

d.

A verbal message that she is wary of visitors and indifferent to communication

ANS: A

Feedback

A

The nonverbal message being sent by Ms. Kruse is that she has a desire for a more open, egalitarian exchange of ideas.

B

The nonverbal message being sent by Ms. Kruse is that she has a desire for a more open, egalitarian exchange of ideas.

C

The nonverbal message being sent by Ms. Kruse is that she has a desire for a more open, egalitarian exchange of ideas.

D

The nonverbal message being sent by Ms. Kruse is that she has a desire for a more open, egalitarian exchange of ideas.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 65 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Application

43. Which of the following sends the least positive nonverbal message?

a.

An employee wears clothing to work that covers her tattoos.

b.

A job candidate arrives for an interview dressed in a conservative charcoal gray business suit.

c.

An employee sends an e-mail message to her colleagues that contains several misspellings and grammatical errors.

d.

A job candidate uses a high-quality printer to make copies of her résumé and cover letter.

ANS: C

Feedback

A

Because the nonverbal messages that tattoos send can hurt someone's professional career, it is best to keep them covered at work.

B

A job candidate arriving who dresses in a conservative charcoal gray business suit for the job interview is sending a positive nonverbal message.

C

Sending an e-mail message full of errors conveys the nonverbal message that the writer doesn't care enough to take the time to make the message read well or look good, which immediately causes the receiver to doubt the credibility of the sender.

D

A job candidate using a high-quality printer to make copies of his or her résumé and cover letter is sending a positive nonverbal message.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 65-67 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Application

44. Which of the following is the most accurate statement about casual apparel in the workplace?

a.

Casual dress has become the norm in today's workplace.

b.

Casual dress policies have led to reduced productivity and lax behavior in some workplaces.

c.

If you're competent, it doesn't matter what you wear.

d.

When meeting customers, dress down to make them feel superior.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Some surveys suggest that the pendulum today seems to be swinging back to more conservative attire in the workplace.

B

Relaxed dress codes lead to reduced productivity, lax behavior, absenteeism, tardiness, and flirtatious behavior.

C

The authority and credibility of casually attired executives are often undermined.

D

When meeting customers, dress as well as or better than they do.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 66-67 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Application

45. Which of the following is an effective way to improve your nonverbal communication skills?

a.

Ignore facial expressions and body language; instead, focus only on the verbal message.

b.

Ask friends and family members to give you feedback on your nonverbal behavior.

c.

Try to avoid associating with people from diverse cultures since you might misunderstand their nonverbal messages.

d.

All of these choices.

ANS: B

Feedback

A

Watch facial expressions and body language carefully to understand the complete message being communicated.

B

Ask friends and family members to monitor your conscious and unconscious body movements and gestures to help you become a more effective communicator.

C

Associate with people from diverse cultures to widen your knowledge of intercultural nonverbal messages.

D

Ask friends and family members to monitor your conscious and unconscious body movements and gestures to help you become a more effective communicator.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 67 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Conceptual

46. Which of the following statements about manners and business etiquette is most accurate?

a.

Good manners and professional demeanor are hard skills that employers value in employees.

b.

Because you aren't born with the ability to be courteous, civil, and professional, learning these skills is difficult.

c.

Employers are more likely to hire and promote someone who is courteous and professional.

d.

All of these choices are accurate statements.

ANS: C

Feedback

A

Good manners and professional demeanor are soft skills that employers value in employees.

B

You can learn how to be courteous, civil, and professional.

C

Employers are far more likely to hire and promote someone who is courteous and professional than one who lacks these skills and traits.

D

Employers are far more likely to hire and promote someone who is courteous and professional than one who lacks these skills and traits.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 68 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Conceptual

47. Which of the following is the best advice for sending professional e-mails on the job?

a.

Use complete sentences and proper punctuation.

b.

Use IM abbreviations to make your messages more concise.

c.

Check grammar and spelling only when sending external messages to save time and increase productivity.

d.

Use a lot of exclamation points to show your enthusiasm.

ANS: A

Feedback

A

Use complete sentences and proper punctuation in all e-mail messages.

B

Avoid using IM abbreviations because receivers might not recognize them.

C

All e-mail messages should be correct to show you care and are knowledgeable.

D

Using a lot of exclamation points makes business e-mail messages look unprofessional.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 68 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Asynchronous messaging

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Conceptual

48. Kelly is about to start her first full-time job after earning her degree and wants to appear as professional as possible. What advice would you give her?

a.

Change her current e-mail address, which is KellyIsSmokingHot@yahoo.com, to something more businesslike.

b.

Use her cell phone only when conversations can be private.

c.

Avoid texting during meetings.

d.

All of these choices will help Kelly appear more professional.

ANS: D

Feedback

A

All of these will help Kelly appear more professional.

B

All of these will help Kelly appear more professional.

C

All of these will help Kelly appear more professional.

D

All of these will help Kelly appear more professional.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 68 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Application

49. Which of the following is the most accurate statement about etiquette and civility in today's workplace?

a.

Etiquette is not as important in today's fast-paced, high-tech offices.

b.

Most people don't mind rudeness or poor manners because they make the workplace more interesting.

c.

Bad manners and incivility are rare in today's workplace.

d.

Etiquette is more about attitude than about formal rules of behavior.

ANS: D

Feedback

A

Even in today's fast-paced, high-tech offices, awareness of courtesy and etiquette can give you a competitive edge.

B

People prefer an agreeable work environment to one that is rude and uncivil.

C

As workloads increase and face-to-face meetings decline, bad manners and incivility are becoming alarmingly common in the American workplace.

D

Etiquette is more about attitude than about formal rules of behavior. Attitude is a desire to show others consideration and respect.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 69 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Conceptual

50. Daniel will be starting a new job soon and wants to exhibit proper business etiquette in his new workplace. What is the best advice you can give him?

a.

Agree with everyone with whom he interacts.

b.

Talk about his personal relationships and finances as a way to appear human and to establish relationships with other employees.

c.

Send written thank-you notes to express sincere appreciation and praise.

d.

Tell as many jokes as possible to put his colleagues at ease.

ANS: C

Feedback

A

You don't have to agree with everyone, but you should respect other people's opinions.

B

Avoid talking about health concerns, personal relationships, and finances in the office.

C

Written thank-you notes are even better than saying thanks in person.

D

Daniel should be careful when telling jokes, especially those that may offend his colleagues.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 69 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Application

TRUE/FALSE

1. Oral and written communication skills, listening proficiency, nonverbal behavior, and etiquette expertise are all examples of hard skills.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Oral and written communication skills, listening proficiency, nonverbal behavior, and etiquette expertise are all examples of soft skills. Hard skills refer to the technical skills in your field.

Incorrect

Oral and written communication skills, listening proficiency, nonverbal behavior, and etiquette expertise are all examples of soft skills. Hard skills refer to the technical skills in your field.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 39 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion

TOP: Becoming a Team Player in Professional Groups TYP: Conceptual

2. Soft skills aren't required in technical fields such as accounting and finance.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Even in technical fields such as accounting and finance, employers are looking for soft skills.

Incorrect

Even in technical fields such as accounting and finance, employers are looking for soft skills.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 40 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion

TOP: Becoming a Team Player in Professional Groups TYP: Conceptual

3. Many companies are turning to teams to innovate, share knowledge, and solve problems.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

In response to intense global competition, many companies are turning to teams to innovate, share knowledge, and solve problems.

Incorrect

In response to intense global competition, many companies are turning to teams to innovate, share knowledge, and solve problems.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 40 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams TYP: Conceptual

4. Generally, teams are able to respond more quickly when solving a problem.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

When action is necessary to respond to competition or to solve a problem, small groups and teams can act rapidly.

Incorrect

When action is necessary to respond to competition or to solve a problem, small groups and teams can act rapidly.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 41 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams TYP: Conceptual

5. Bethany's team is experiencing considerable conflict and tension as they get used to working with one another. They are most likely in the storming phase of team development.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Bethany's team is most likely in the storming phase of team development. During this phase members define their roles and responsibilities, decide how to reach their goals, and iron out the rules governing how they interact. Unfortunately, this stage often produces conflict.

Incorrect

Bethany's team is most likely in the storming phase of team development. During this phase members define their roles and responsibilities, decide how to reach their goals, and iron out the rules governing how they interact. Unfortunately, this stage often produces conflict.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 43 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams TYP: Application

6. Some teams never reach the final stage of team development of performing.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Experience shows that some teams never reach the final stage of team development: performing.

Incorrect

Experience shows that some teams never reach the final stage of team development: performing.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 43 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams TYP: Conceptual

7. Negative team behaviors include actions such as putting down the ideas and suggestions of others, insulting or criticizing others, wasting time, making inappropriate comments, and withdrawing.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Actions such as putting down the ideas and suggestions of others, insulting or criticizing others, wasting time, making inappropriate comments, and withdrawing hinder a team's progress toward its goals.

Incorrect

Actions such as putting down the ideas and suggestions of others, insulting or criticizing others, wasting time, making inappropriate comments, and withdrawing hinder a team's progress toward its goals.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 44 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Conceptual

8. Conflict is a normal part of every workplace and every team.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Conflict is a normal part of every workplace and every team and is not always negative. When managed properly, conflict can improve decision-making, clarify values, increase group cohesiveness, stimulate creativity, decrease tensions, and reduce dissatisfaction.

Incorrect

Conflict is a normal part of every workplace and every team and is not always negative. When managed properly, conflict can improve decision-making, clarify values, increase group cohesiveness, stimulate creativity, decrease tensions, and reduce dissatisfaction.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 44 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Conceptual

9. When following the six-step pattern for dealing with conflict, the first thing you should do is look for common ground.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

The first step you should take when experiencing conflict is listen ensure that you understand the problem.

Incorrect

The first step you should take when experiencing conflict is listen ensure that you understand the problem.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 44 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Conceptual

10. Teams should strive to achieve groupthink to ensure that all team members agree.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Groupthink should be avoided because it is a faulty decision-making process in which team members are overly eager to agree with one another.

Incorrect

Groupthink should be avoided because it is a faulty decision-making process in which team members are overly eager to agree with one another.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 45 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Conceptual

11. A method of group decision making where group members bargain and negotiate to reach a middle ground is known as consensus.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Averaging is a method of group decision making where group members haggle, bargain, wheedle, and negotiate to reach a middle ground, which often requires compromise. In consensus, discussion continues until all team members have aired their opinions and, ultimately, agree.

Incorrect

Averaging is a method of group decision making where group members haggle, bargain, wheedle, and negotiate to reach a middle ground, which often requires compromise. In consensus, discussion continues until all team members have aired their opinions and, ultimately, agree.

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 45 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Definition

12. Diverse teams can usually produce innovative solutions with broader applications than more homogeneous (similar) teams.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Diverse teams can usually produce innovative solutions with broader applications than more homogeneous teams.

Incorrect

Diverse teams can usually produce innovative solutions with broader applications than more homogeneous teams.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 46 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork | AACSB: Tier 1 - Diversity | AACSB: Tier 2 - Cultural imperatives TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior

TYP: Conceptual

13. Teams are most effective when individual members are able to compete with one another.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Effective team members are genuinely interested in achieving team goals instead of receiving individual recognition. They collaborate rather than compete.

Incorrect

Effective team members are genuinely interested in achieving team goals instead of receiving individual recognition. They collaborate rather than compete.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 47 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Conceptual

14. The real expense of a meeting is the lost productivity of all the people attending.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Because the real expense of a meeting is the lost productivity of all the people attending, you should always decide whether a meeting is necessary before scheduling it.

Incorrect

Because the real expense of a meeting is the lost productivity of all the people attending, you should always decide whether a meeting is necessary before scheduling it.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 49 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Application

15. A good agenda includes any premeeting preparation expected of participants.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

An agenda should include any premeeting preparation expected of participants.

Incorrect

An agenda should include any premeeting preparation expected of participants.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 50 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

16. As meeting leader, Orhan should wait until all participants arrive before starting the meeting.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Meetings should always begin on time, even if some participants are missing. Waiting for latecomers causes resentment and sets a bad precedent.

Incorrect

Meetings should always begin on time, even if some participants are missing. Waiting for latecomers causes resentment and sets a bad precedent.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 51 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Application

17. You are chairing a meeting where two participants are in disagreement. The best method to resolve this conflict is to encourage each to make a complete case while group members give their full attention.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

If two people are in conflict, the best approach is to encourage each to make a complete case while group members give their full attention.

Incorrect

If two people are in conflict, the best approach is to encourage each to make a complete case while group members give their full attention.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 52 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Application

18. Today's communication technologies allow employees to exchange ideas, brainstorm, build consensus, and develop personal relationships virtually.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Instead of meeting face to face, today's technologies allow employees to meet virtually to exchange ideas, brainstorm, build consensus, and develop personal relationships.

Incorrect

Instead of meeting face to face, today's technologies allow employees to meet virtually to exchange ideas, brainstorm, build consensus, and develop personal relationships.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 53 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

19. Audioconferencing combines video, audio, and communications networking technologies for real-time interaction.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Videoconferencing combines video, audio, and communications networking technologies for real-time interaction.

Incorrect

Videoconferencing combines video, audio, and communications networking technologies for real-time interaction.

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 54 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution, Synchronous messaging

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Definition

20. A major problem with virtual meetings is that words and tone can be easily misinterpreted.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

A major problem when people are not facing each other is that any small infraction or miscue can be blown out of proportion. Words and tone can be easily misinterpreted.

Incorrect

A major problem when people are not facing each other is that any small infraction or miscue can be blown out of proportion. Words and tone can be easily misinterpreted.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 55 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution, Synchronous messaging

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

21. Unlike in face-to-face meetings, ground rules are not needed in virtual meetings.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

During virtual meetings establishing a few ground rules achieves the best results. Examples of ground rules are defining ways that questions may be asked and answered, turning off cell phones during the meeting, and not allowing multitasking.

Incorrect

During virtual meetings establishing a few ground rules achieves the best results. Examples of ground rules are defining ways that questions may be asked and answered, turning off cell phones during the meeting, and not allowing multitasking.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 56-57 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution, Synchronous messaging

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Conceptual

22. Good listening skills are needed for employees at every level.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Listening skills are important for career success, organization effectiveness, and worker satisfaction at all levels.

Incorrect

Listening skills are important for career success, organization effectiveness, and worker satisfaction at all levels.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 58 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

23. Most of us listen at only 25 percent efficiency.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Experts say that we listen at only 25 percent efficiency. In other words, we ignore, forget, distort, or misunderstand 75 percent of everything we hear.

Incorrect

Experts say that we listen at only 25 percent efficiency. In other words, we ignore, forget, distort, or misunderstand 75 percent of everything we hear.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 58 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

24. Soft skills such as listening, writing, and speaking are most likely to determine hiring and career success.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Studies of Fortune 500 companies report that soft skills such as listening, writing, and speaking are most likely to determine hiring and career success.

Incorrect

Studies of Fortune 500 companies report that soft skills such as listening, writing, and speaking are most likely to determine hiring and career success.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 58 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

25. If you are an entry-level employee, you will probably be most concerned with listening to superiors.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Entry-level employees are usually most concerned with listening to supervisors, but they must also develop skills for listening to colleagues and team members.

Incorrect

Entry-level employees are usually most concerned with listening to supervisors, but they must also develop skills for listening to colleagues and team members.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 59 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

26. Sharon is listening to her colleague and must judge and evaluate what he is saying. She is listening to decide whether her colleague's message is fact, fiction, or opinion. Sharon is engaging in discriminative listening.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Sharon is engaging in critical listening. Critical listening is necessary when you must judge and evaluate what you are hearing. It means that you must decide whether the speaker's message is fact, fiction, or opinion and whether an argument is based on logic or emotion.

Incorrect

Sharon is engaging in critical listening. Critical listening is necessary when you must judge and evaluate what you are hearing. It means that you must decide whether the speaker's message is fact, fiction, or opinion and whether an argument is based on logic or emotion.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 59 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Application

27. Listening to customers usually results in increased sales and profitability, as well as improved customer retention.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Listening to customers rewards an organization through increased sales and profitability, as well as improved customer acquisition and retention.

Incorrect

Listening to customers rewards an organization through increased sales and profitability, as well as improved customer acquisition and retention.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 59 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

28. Listening on the job is more challenging than listening in a college classroom.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Listening on the job is more challenging than listening in a college classroom because information is often exchanged casually.

Incorrect

Listening on the job is more challenging than listening in a college classroom because information is often exchanged casually.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 59 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

29. When listening to nonnative speakers, always correct their grammar and pronunciation immediately to help them improve their language skills.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Although you are trying to help a nonnative speaker, it is better to focus on what's being expressed instead of focusing on correct grammar and pronunciation.

Incorrect

Although you are trying to help a nonnative speaker, it is better to focus on what's being expressed instead of focusing on correct grammar and pronunciation.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 61 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns | AACSB: Tier 1 - Diversity | AACSB: Tier 2 - Cultural imperatives TOP: Listening in the Workplace TYP: Conceptual

30. Avoid taking notes during a presentation or lecture because doing so can cause you to miss something.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Take notes during a presentation or lecture to ensure retention.

Incorrect

Take notes during a presentation or lecture to ensure retention.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 62 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Conceptual

31. Eye contact, facial expressions, body movements, space, time, distance, and appearance are all examples of nonverbal communication.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Eye contact, facial expressions, body movements, space, time, distance, and appearance are all forms of nonverbal communication.

Incorrect

Eye contact, facial expressions, body movements, space, time, distance, and appearance are all forms of nonverbal communication.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 63 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Conceptual

32. Dario makes sure his office is neat and organized before he goes home at the end of the day. This nonverbal action helps to reinforce and accentuate Dario's professionalism.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Dario's actions help to reinforce and accentuate his professionalism.

Incorrect

Dario's actions help to reinforce and accentuate his professionalism.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 63 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Application

33. Eye contact has the same in meaning in all cultures.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Nonverbal cues, including eye contact, have different meanings in different cultures.

Incorrect

Nonverbal cues, including eye contact, have different meanings in different cultures.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 64 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns | AACSB: Tier 1 - Diversity | AACSB: Tier 2 - Cultural imperatives TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages

TYP: Conceptual

34. Antonia arrives 15 minutes late for the accounting department's monthly meeting. The nonverbal message Antonia is sending is positive.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

The nonverbal message Antonia is sending is that the meeting is not very important.

Incorrect

The nonverbal message Antonia is sending is that the meeting is not very important.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 65 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Analysis | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Application

35. When communicating with coworkers and acquaintances, North Americans generally keep a distance of between 0 and 1 1/2 feet.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

North Americans generally keep a distance of between 4 and 12 feet when communicating with coworkers and acquaintances. Only intimate friends and family may stand closer than about 1 1/2 feet.

Incorrect

North Americans generally keep a distance of between 4 and 12 feet when communicating with coworkers and acquaintances. Only intimate friends and family may stand closer than about 1 1/2 feet.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 65 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns | AACSB: Tier 1 - Diversity | AACSB: Tier 2 - Cultural imperatives TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages

TYP: Conceptual

36. Because e-mail is an informal communication tool, it's not necessary to check your messages for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

Because e-mails are business documents that create a permanent record, these messages should be checked for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

Incorrect

Because e-mails are business documents that create a permanent record, these messages should be checked for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 66 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Asynchronous messaging TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages

TYP: Application

37. In the workplace you are more likely to be taken seriously and more likely to be promoted if you look and sound professional.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Employees who look and sound professional are much more likely to be taken seriously and to be promoted.

Incorrect

Employees who look and sound professional are much more likely to be taken seriously and to be promoted.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 68 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Conceptual

38. To stand out in the workplace, create an outgoing voice mail message that has music playing in the background or that includes a funny joke.

ANS: F

Feedback

Correct

A professional outgoing voice mail message should include your name, number, and instructions for leaving a message. Avoid background music, weird sounds, or jokes.

Incorrect

A professional outgoing voice mail message should include your name, number, and instructions for leaving a message. Avoid background music, weird sounds, or jokes.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 68 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Conceptual

39. Incivility in the workplace can lead to a drop in productivity and higher turnover.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

Employers suffer because incivility in the workplace can lead to lower productivity and higher turnover.

Incorrect

Employers suffer because incivility in the workplace can lead to lower productivity and higher turnover.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 69 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Conceptual

40. In the workplace it is important to respect coworkers' space by minimizing speakerphone use and avoiding the use of heavy perfumes or colognes.

ANS: T

Feedback

Correct

To respect your coworkers' space, turn down the ringer on your business phone, minimize the use of speakerphones, turn your personal cell phone off or down during business hours, and avoid wearing heavy perfumes and colognes and bringing strong-smelling food.

Incorrect

To respect your coworkers' space, turn down the ringer on your business phone, minimize the use of speakerphones, turn your personal cell phone off or down during business hours, and avoid wearing heavy perfumes and colognes and bringing strong-smelling food.

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 69 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Conceptual

COMPLETION

1. ____________________ skills, such as the ability to use Microsoft Word or to prepare an income statement, refer to the technical skills in your field.

ANS: Hard

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 39 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion

TOP: Becoming a Team Player in Professional Groups TYP: Definition

2. ____________________ skills include competencies such as listening proficiency, nonverbal behavior, and etiquette expertise.

ANS: Soft

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 39 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion

TOP: Becoming a Team Player in Professional Groups TYP: Definition

3. Many organizations are creating ____________________ teams, which are groups of people who use technology to work interdependently with a shared purpose across space, time, and organization boundaries.

ANS: virtual

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 41 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams

TYP: Definition

4. In Tuckman's team growth model, during the ____________________ stage of team development, individuals get to know each other and search for similarities as they attempt to bond.

ANS: forming

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 43 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams TYP: Definition

5. During the ____________________ stage of team development, tension subsides, roles are clarified, and information begins to flow among members.

ANS: norming

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 43 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams TYP: Definition

6. ____________________ describes faulty decision-making processes by team members who are overly eager to agree with one another.

ANS: Groupthink

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 45 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Definition

7. Teams may reach a decision by ____________________, which requires that discussion continues until all members have aired their opinions and, ultimately, agree.

ANS: consensus

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 45 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Definition

8. ____________________ consist of three or more individuals who gather to pool information, solicit feedback, clarify policy, seek consensus, and solve problems.

ANS: Meetings

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 48 OBJ: 2-3

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Definition

9. A meeting ____________________, which is distributed in advance of a meeting, lists date and place of the meeting, start time and end time, topics to be discussed, time allocated to each topic, and any premeeting preparation expected of participants.

ANS: agenda

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 50 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Meetings

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Definition

10. ____________________ calendars such as Google Calendar and Yahoo Calendar make scheduling meetings faster and more efficient.

ANS: Digital

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 51 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution

TOP: Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face Workplace Meetings

TYP: Definition

11. One of the simplest collaboration tools is ____________________ (also called teleconferencing) in which one or more people in a work area use an enhanced speakerphone to confer with others by telephone.

ANS: audioconferencing

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 54 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Definition

12. ____________________ conferencing allows attendees to use their computers to access an online, virtual meeting room where they can present PowerPoint slides, share spreadsheets and Word documents, demonstrate products, and interact with participants in real time.

ANS: Web

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 55 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution, Synchronous messaging

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Definition

13. ____________________ listening enables you to judge and evaluate what you are hearing.

ANS: Critical

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 59 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Definition

14. Rephrasing and summarizing a speaker's message in your own words is called ____________________.

ANS: paraphrasing

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 62 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Definition

15. Use ____________________ time, the extra time you have between the speaker's ideas, to review what the speaker is saying.

ANS: lag

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 62 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Improving Workplace Listening TYP: Definition

16. ____________________ communication includes all unwritten and unspoken messages, both internal and unintentional. Examples include eye contact, facial expressions, body movements, space, time, distance, and appearance.

ANS: Nonverbal

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 63 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Definition

17. The ____________________ have been called the "windows to the soul" and are considered to be the most accurate predictor of a speaker's true feelings and attitudes.

ANS: eyes

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 64 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Conceptual

18. We all maintain territory zones of ____________________ in which we feel comfortable. Anthropologist Edward T. Hall identified four of these zones of social interaction among Americans.

ANS: privacy

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 65 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns | AACSB: Tier 1 - Diversity | AACSB: Tier 2 - Cultural imperatives TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages

TYP: Definition

19. Employees can sound more professional in the workplace by avoiding ____________________, which is making declarative sentences sound like questions.

ANS: uptalk

PTS: 1 DIF: 1 REF: p. 68 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Definition

20. ____________________ is more about attitude than about formal rules of behavior and can give you a competitive edge in today's workplace.

ANS: Etiquette

PTS: 1 DIF: 3 REF: p. 69 OBJ: 2-7

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Conclusion | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Patterns

TOP: Developing a Competitive Edge With Professionalism and Business Etiquette Skills

TYP: Conceptual

ESSAY

1. Describe five reasons that organizations are developing groups and teams.

ANS:

Students will select five of the following and answers will vary.

1)

Better decisions: Because group and team members have different expertise and perspectives, decisions are generally more accurate and effective.

2)

Faster response: Small groups and teams can act rapidly when action is necessary to respond to competition or to solve a problem.

3)

Increased productivity: Team members tend to be closer to the action and to the customer, allowing them to see opportunities for improving efficiencies, which leads to greater productivity.

4)

Greater "buy-in": When group or team members are part of the decision-making process, they are generally more committed to the solution and are more willing to support it.

5)

Less resistance to change: People who have input into making decisions are less hostile, less aggressive, and less resistant to change.

6)

Improved employee morale: When teams are successful, personal satisfaction and job morale increase.

7)

Reduced risks: A group or team member's individual risk is reduced because responsibility for a decision is diffused among all group or team members.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 40-41 OBJ: 2-1

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Theory application | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Preparing to Work With Groups and Teams TYP: Application

2. List five characteristics of successful teams and explain why each characteristic leads to team success.

ANS:

Students will select five of the following and answers will vary.

1)

Small size, diverse makeup: For most functions the best teams range from 2 to 25 members, although 4 or 5 is optimum for many projects. Smaller-sized teams make interaction and decision-making more effective. When team members are made up of people who differ in gender, age, social background, training, and experience, more creative and innovative decisions can be made.

2)

Agreement on purpose: An effective team begins with a purpose and all members understand that purpose. Working from a general purpose to specific goals typically requires a huge investment of time and effort. Meaningful discussions about the team's purpose can motivate team members to "buy into" the project.

3)

Agreement on procedures: The best teams develop procedures to guide them and continually evaluate those procedures to ensure they are moving toward their goals. They set up intermediate goals with deadlines. They assign roles and tasks, requiring all members to contribute equivalent amounts of real work. They decide how they will reach decisions.

4)

Ability to confront conflict: Successful teams acknowledge conflict and address the root of the problem openly by using conflict resolution techniques. Direct confrontation saves time and enhances team commitment in the long run. Conflict can be constructive when it is task oriented, not person oriented.

5)

Use of good communication techniques: The best teams exchange information and contribute ideas freely in an informal environment. Team members speak clearly and concisely, avoiding generalities. They encourage feedback. Listeners become actively involved, read body language, and ask clarifying questions before responding. Tactful, constructive disagreement is encouraged.

6)

Ability to collaborate rather than compete: Effective team members are genuinely interested in achieving team goals instead of receiving individual recognition; therefore, they celebrate individual and team accomplishments. They contribute ideas and feedback unselfishly. They monitor team progress, including what's going right, what's going wrong, and what to do about it.

7)

Acceptance of ethical responsibilities: Teams as a whole have ethical responsibilities to their members, to their larger organizations, and to society. Members have a number of specific responsibilities to each other; as a whole, groups have a responsibility to represent the organization's view and respect its privileged information.

8)

Shared leadership: Effective teams often have no formal leader. Instead, leadership rotates to those with the appropriate expertise as the team evolves and moves from one phase to another. This approach can achieve buy-in to team decisions, boost morale, and create fewer hurt feelings and less resentment.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 46-48 OBJ: 2-2

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Theory application | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Analyzing Positive and Negative Team Behavior TYP: Application

3. Describe three collaboration tools that can be used for meeting facilitation when distance or other factors prevent face-to-face gatherings.

ANS:

Answers will vary.

1)

Audioconferencing (or teleconferencing): Audioconferencing involves one or two people who confer with others by telephone.

2)

Videoconferencing: Videoconferencing combines video, audio, and communications networking technologies for real-time interaction. Generally, participants meet in special conference rooms equipped with cameras and television screens for transmitting images and documents.

3)

Web conferencing: With Web conferencing, attendees use their computers to access an online virtual meeting room where they can present PowerPoint slides or share spreadsheets or Word documents, just as they might do in a face-to-face meeting.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 54 OBJ: 2-4

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Theory application | AACSB: Tier 1 - Technology | AACSB: Tier 2 - Communication evolution

TOP: Using Effective Practices and Technologies in Virtual Meetings

TYP: Application

4. Your department has hired a new employee from Indonesia who is just learning to speak English. List and describe five techniques you will use to listen more effectively to your new colleague.

ANS:

Student answers will vary.

1)

Avoid negative judgment of accented speech: Many nonnative speakers of English speak an articulate, insightful, and complex variety of English. Their speech may retain remnants of their native language. Don't assume that a nonnative speaker struggling with pronunciation is unintelligent.

2)

Be patient: Americans are notoriously poor listeners. Strive to overcome the need to hurry a conversation along. Give nonnative speakers time to express their thoughts.

3)

Don't finish sentences: Allow nonnative speakers to choose their words and complete their sentences without volunteering your help.

4)

Don't correct grammar and pronunciation: It's better to focus on what's being expressed and forget about teaching English.

5)

Don't pretend to understand: It's perfectly all right to tell a speaker that you're having a little difficulty understanding him or her.

6)

Practice listening to many varieties of English: Improving your skill at comprehending many accents, as well as native dialects, can be a valuable skill in today's diverse and intercultural workplace.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 61 OBJ: 2-5

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Theory application | AACSB: Tier 1 - Diversity | AACSB: Tier 2 - Cultural imperatives TOP: Listening in the Workplace

TYP: Application

5. Describe three forms of nonverbal communication and give a workplace example of each.

ANS:

Students will choose three of the following and answers will vary.

1)

Eye contact: The eyes have been called the "windows to the soul," and communicators consider the eyes to be the most accurate predictor of a speaker's true feelings and attitudes. Good eye contact enables the message sender to determine whether a receiver is paying attention, showing respect, responding favorably, or feeling distress. From the receiver's perspective, good eye contact reveals the speaker's sincerity, confidence, and truthfulness. During a business meeting, for instance, an employee should maintain eye contact with a supervisor to convey respect and to show that he or she is paying attention.

2)

Facial expressions: The expression on a communicator's face can be almost as revealing of emotion as the eyes. Researchers estimate that the human face can display over 250,000 different expressions. In the workplace an employee must pay careful attention to a customer's facial expression to better understand the customer's response.

3)

Posture and gestures: An individual's general posture can convey anything from high status and self-confidence to shyness and submissiveness. Posture can also communicate such things as attraction, interest, fear, distrust, anxiety, or disgust. Gestures can also communicate entire thoughts via simple movements. For example, in an interview the job candidate should use an upright posture to indicate confidence.

4)

Time: How we structure and how we use time tell observers about our personality and attitudes. For example, an employee who consistently arrives a few minutes late for work shows the employer a lack of commitment to the organization

5)

Space: How we arrange things in the space around us tells something about ourselves and our objectives. For example, an employee who keeps his or her work area well-organized and clean shows professionalism.

6)

Territory: Each of us has certain areas that we feel are our own territory, and we all maintain zones of privacy in which we feel comfortable. For example, a supervisor who conducts meetings with individual employees by seating himself or herself behind a desk with the employee seated at the other side of the desk indicates a desire for distance and formality.

7)

Appearance of business documents: The way a letter, memo, e-mail message, report, or other business document looks can have either a positive or a negative effect on the receiver. For example, a hastily written message containing writing errors may not only make the writer appear unprofessional but may also create an unclear message for the reader.

8)

Appearance of people: The way you look¾your clothing, grooming, and posture¾communicates an instant nonverbal message about you. For this reason, job candidates are encouraged to dress professionally for all job interviews.

PTS: 1 DIF: 5 REF: p. 64-66 OBJ: 2-6

NAT: AACSB: Tier 1 - Reflective thinking | AACSB: Tier 2 - Theory application | AACSB: Tier 1 - Communication | AACSB: Tier 2 - Teamwork

TOP: Communicating Through Nonverbal Messages TYP: Application

No comments:

Post a Comment

Linkwithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...